Ministry of Defence
Ministry of Defence

Lest We Forget
British Legion
The Royal British Legion

NEWARK RANSOME AND MARLE WAR MEMORIAL

World War 1 - Detailed Information
Compiled and Copyright © Martin Edwards 2021

The Ransome and Marles Employees War memorial is to be found on the exterior wall of the former works now NSK - RHP WORKS. Northern Road, Newark-on-Trent. It takes the form of a domed bronze plaque with a relief of crossed flags above the text. There are 39 names listed for World War 1 only. The memorial may have been moved to a position outside the main entrance of the company's offices from a works canteen the site of which is now owned by another company. The names are listed by rank within regiment by initial. The company's full title was Ransome & Marles Bearing Co., Ltd.

Note: Ransome & Marles Bearing Company Limited was the owner of a business making ball and roller bearings founded during the First World War to make bearings for aircraft and other engines. Before the war most bearings had been imported and most of those were from Germany. The business is now part of NSK UK Limited but Ransome & Marles former plant, Stanley Works, remains in operation in Northern Road, Newark NG24 2JF, Nottinghamshire

Note: Researching the names for a company with no reference point is very difficult and some details may be incorrect. The photographs of the men are taken mainly from the Newark Herald and are not necessarily of the best quality.

Extract from Newark Herald - Saturday 2 March 1918, page 2:

Ransome & Marles Bearing
Co., Ltd.
desire to get into communication
with Householders who
may be able to
offer accommodation,
with or without board, suitable
for their
Munition Workers, Girls,
Labourers. and Staff

who are engaged upon urgent
war work which is of vital
importance
to the
country.

Photographs Copyright © Barbara Kramer 2021

THIS TABLET IS ERECTED IN MEMORY OF
THE UNDERMENTIONED EMPLOYEES
OF THESE WORKS WHO GAVE THEIR LIVES
FOR THEIR COUNTRY IN ITS STRUGGLE FOR
HONOUR, JUSTICE AND LIBERTY
IN THE GREAT WORLD WAR 1914 - 1919

BALL Thomas
Private G/72373, 7th Battalion, Queen's (Royal West Surrey Regiment) formerly 105769, Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment). Killed in action 23 August 1918. Born Lincoln, Lincolnshire, resident and enlisted Newark, Nottinghamshire. Son of Willit and Emma Ball, of 15, Vernon St., Newark. Buried in BECOURT MILITARY CEMETERY, BECORDEL-BECOURT, Somme, France. Plot II. Row E. Grave 6.
BROCKTON George

[Listed as Sherwood Rangers on memorial and BROCTON on SDGW] Private T/206932, 7th Battalion, The Queen's (Royal West Surrey Regiment). formerly 46947, Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment). Killed in action 10 August 1917. Aged 19. Born and resident Farndon, Nottinghamshire, enlisted Newark, Nottinghamshire. Son of George and Lucy Brockton, of Farndon, Newark. No known grave. Commemorated on YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 11 - 13 and 14.

Extract from Newark Herald - Saturday 13 October 1917, page 5:

FARNDON.
PTE. G. BROCKTON, REPORTED
MISSING.

Pte. Geo. Brockton, 20 years of age, of the Quern's Royal West Surreys, is reported as missing on August 10th, after the attack on Inverness Copse. The younger son of Mr. and Mrs. George Brockton, Farndon, he, upon leaving the Newark Magnus School became apprenticed to Messrs. Ransomes, and joined up in May, 1915, going to France in June, 1917. It is hoped that better news will soon be received and his parents relieved from their present anxiety.

BRYAN Fred

Private 2146, 1st/8th Battalion, Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment). Killed in action 15 October 1915. Born and enlisted Newark, Nottinghamshire. No known grave. Commemorated on LOOS MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France. Panel 87 to 89.

Extract from Newark Herald - Saturday 23 December 1916, page 6:

OUR HONOURED DEAD

PTE. F. BRYAN, NEWARK

Mrs. S. A. Bryan, of 94, Beacon-hill, recently received the sad news that her younger son, Pte. F. Bryan, of the Notts. and Derbys, and missing and believed to be killed. He was employed by Messrs. Caferata, but enlisted a fortnight after declaration of hostilities. On October 15th, he was reported wounded and and now is believed dead. His 23rd birthday was celebrated in the trenches last August. Leave was granted to him in September, 1915, and he had only been returned to France about a fortnight before he was found to be missing. Deceased is the youngest of five, his brother Ernest being now at the front. Pte. Bryan was locally well-known as a prominent footballer, playing at one time as outside left to the Castle Rovers, of which his brother Jack was some time captain. Two gold and one silver medals were won by him as a footballer. In the season 1912-13 he helped Wakes and Lamb's to win the championship of Newark and District League and the Notts Junior Cup. Much sympathy is extended to the parents in their sad loss.

COPLEY William Richard

Private 2363, 1st/8th Battalion, S Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment). Killed in action 13 April 1915. Aged 21. Born Westborough, Lincolnshire, enlisted Newark, Nottinghamshire. Only son of William Richard and Hannah Copley, of Westborough, Lincs. Enlisted September 1914. Former scholar at the Wesleyan School. Buried in KEMMEL CHATEAU MILITARY CEMETERY, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Row E. Grave 58.

Photograph from Newark Herald - Saturday 24 April 1915, page 8.

Extract from Newark Herald - Saturday 24 April 1915, page 7:

NEWARK TERRITORIAL KILLED IN
ACTION.
FORMER C.L.B. STAFF-SERGEANT.

The first casualty among the Newark territorials at the front—the First 8th Sherwood Foresters—whose headquarters are at the Newark Drill Hall, has taken place in the death of Private William Copley, son of Mrs. Copley, of 39, William-street, who enlisted on the outbreak of war. Deceased was formally in the Church Lads’ Brigade, and obtained his five years’ service medal. He also belonged to the Scouts, was a member of the Churchman’s Club, and took a keen interest in many other Church organisations. Young Copley who at the outbreak of war had just finished his apprenticeship at Messrs. Ransome and Co’s, as a turner, had endeavoured four times to join the army, his preferences being the Royal Engineers, but he as rejected on every occasion owing to defective teeth, and then accepted in the local Territorials. He was highly popular with the C.L.B. in Newark, in which he was Staff Sergeant and Bandmaster, and those who knew him speak highly of his character. At the funeral of the deceased soldier among those present were Col. Walker, who has had a lot to do with the C.L.B., Major R. F. B. Hodgkinson, and Lieut. Davenport, who is also a Captain in the C.L.B.

The following sympathetic letters from Newark officers have been received by Mrs. Copley, William-street:-

Surgeon-Captain H. Stallard, of Newark wrote as follows to Mrs. Copley:-

I am writing a few lines to say how much I sympathise with you in the loss of your son, who was so good a soldier and a credit to the battalion to which he belonged. It may be a little consolation to you to know that he did not suffer any pain, as he was instantly killed, and that his body was brought from the trenches by my bearers, and he was buried in the military cemetery, where a pretty cross marked the spot.

The Chaplain (Rev. J. P. Hales) wrote:-

I must send a line of sympathy to your great sorrow. I am the chaplain of the Sherwood Foresters Brigade. We laid your dear lad to rest last night, by the side of many brave comrades who have laid down their lives for their country and the cause of righteousness, and for which we are fighting. It is a peaceful spot just outside the village. These funerals are so impressive, It is dark except for the flares which are sent up all along the fighting lines. You hear the guns and rifles all the time, but nothing can disturb the message of peace and eternal hope. Life has conquered death, and these dear men are entered late the fullest of life and nearer Presence of God. “Greater love has no man than this, that a man lay down his life for his friends.” But you, I know, are feeling the terrible loss and blank; yet you share in the victory, for you have given of your best, and God will comfort and strengthen you. You will always know that you had a son who did not fail to do his duty when the call came. We sang the last verse of “Son of my Soul” before we came away. What a message it was! God bless and comfort you.

Major J. P. Beecher, of Southwell, and partner if the firm of Messrs. Larken and Co., solicitors Newark, wrote as follows:

You will have heard from Dr. Stallard the sad news of your son having been killed in the trenches, which I got back from at 5 a.m. this morning. Your son has been with my company all the time he has been with his regiment, and I am writing to sympathise with you in your great loss. Nothing I can say can in any way alleviate your loss, but I can only tell you his death was practically instantaneous, and he did not suffer at all. He died the death of a soldier, doing his duty, as he always did. He is buried in a proper cemetery for English soldiers at a place called Kismet, in Belgium, and later on we can no doubt arrange if you would like to have bulbs planted on his grave.

Lieut. C. Davenport, who before the war was a master of the Magnus Grammar School, Newark, wrote:

By the time you receive this letter I expect you will have heard from the War Office that your son, W. R. Copley, has been killed in action. He was shot in the head, and, I believe, died at once and without any pain. Dr. Stallard saw him, and you will received his personal belongings very shortly. He was buried last night in a soldiers’ cemetery, just behind the firing line. You will be sent full particulars later and the exact position of his grave is marked and a small cross has been placed over it. Perhaps you may wonder why I should write to you, as I am quite a stranger, but I used to have a lot to do with your son in the C.L.B. at Newark, and I want to express my sincere sympathy with you in the loss you have sustained, Nothing can take a son’s place, I know, but I hope you will have some comfort from the thought that your son died for his King and country.—He did his duty, and did it nobly, and nothing can be more noble than the true soldier’s death.

CROWDER George

[Listed as Lancashire Regiment on memorial] Private 37059, 2nd Battalion, Lancashire Fusiliers formerly 44788, North Staffordshire Regiment. Killed in action 12 October 1916. Aged 34. Born Fiskerton, Nottinghamshire, resident Newark, Nottinghamshire, enlisted Derby. Son of Edward and Sarah Crowder, of 45, Sleaford Rd., Newark, Notts. No known grave. Commemorated on THIEPVAL MEMORIAL, Somme, France. Pier and Face 3 C and 3 D.

Extract from Newark Herald - Saturday 1 September 1917, page 6:

PTE. GEO. CROWDER. NEWARK

Mr. and Mrs. Ed Crowder, of 45, Sleaford-road, Newark. have received an intimation from the War Office that their second son, Pte. Geo. Crowder, of the Lancashire Fusiliers, who has been missing since October 12th, is now presumed to have been killed in action. Pte. Crowder, who was 34 years age, was a native Fiskerton. For some years previous to being called up he worked at Messrs. Ransomes' in the ball-bearing department, and joined the Army on May 1st, posted to the North Staffords. He went out to France on 28th August, and was transferred to the Lancashire Fusiliers just a fortnight before he was posted missing on October 28th, being in the Army barely six months. He was very much respected by all who knew him, and the greatest sympathy is extended to his sorrowing parents.

DAVISON William Allured
Private 305831, "B" Company, 2nd/7th Battalion, Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment). Killed in action 26 September 1917. Aged 22. Born Balderton, Nottinghamshire, enlisted Newark, Nottinghamshire. Son of Matthew and Kate Davison, of 10, Sherwood Avenue, Newark, Notts. No known grave. Commemorated on TYNE COT MEMORIAL, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 99 to 102.
DURHAM Herbert Leslie

Lance Corporal 24101, 1st Battalion, Lancashire Fusiliers formerly 18550, Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment). Killed in action 6 September 1915 at Gallipoli. Aged 21. Born Bournemouth, enlisted Newark, Nottinghamshire. Son of Emily Durham, of "Bowood," 3, Wellington Rd., Bournemouth, and the late James Durham. Buried in AZMAK CEMETERY, SUVLA, Turkey (including Gallipoli). Plot I. Row B. Grave 16.

Extract from Newark Herald - Saturday 25 September 1915, page 8:

YOUNG NEWARK OARSMAN
KILLED IN ACTION.

LANCE-CORPL. H. LESLIE DURHAM

On Wednesday the sad intelligence was received that Lancel-Corpl. H. Leslie Durham had been killed in action. He was only 21 years of age, the seventh son of Mr. James Durham, of Bournemouth, and younger brother of Mr. H. W. Durham, of Messrs. Ransome and Co., where he was employed up to the time he enlisted, having been apprenticed to the engineering, and had so far progressed as to have entered the drawing office. Last November he joined the 3rd Sherwood Foresters, Notts. And Derby Regiment(Kitchener’s Army), and was drafted to Plymouth straight away, from whence he went to Sunderland, and was, subsequently, transferred to the Lancashire Fusiliers, 29th Division, which was disappointing, for it to0ok him away from friends, to serve with strangers. Immediately following transference, he was sent to the Dardanelles, and on August 30th he wrote to his brother, in the course of which he stated, "We are living in trenches and dug-outs of a sort, and, though we have not been in action, a lot of shells have burst over us, only doing occasional damage.

Lance-Corpl. Durham was one of the first members of the Newark Legion of Volunteers, from which he joined the regular Army, and is the first of their number to lay down his life for King and Country, as he is also in connection with Messrs. Ransome and Co.'s drawing office. He was exceedingly popular, and death is deeply deplored by a wide circle of friends and acquaintances.

Young Durham was a well-known member of the Newark Rowing Club and won renown as a keen oarsman. He was the holder of the Trent Challenge Cup, having won it in 1914, repeating his performance of the previous year, He was number two in the winning crew of the “maidens” form the Berry Cup at Nottingham Regatta on July 25th last year.

ELLIS Charles Ernest
Private 2275, 1st/8th Battalion, Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment). Died on service 28 March 1916. Aged 26. Born and resident Chesterfield, Derbyshire, enlisted Newark, Nottinghamshire. Son of Alfred and Anne Ellis, of 8, Lower Grove Rd., Chesterfield, Derbyshire. Buried in STE. MARIE CEMETERY, LE HAVRE, Seine-Maritime, France. Division 19. Row V. Grave 4.
FOSTER Walter

Private 267418, 15th Battalion, Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment). Died of wounds 4 April 1918. Aged 34. Enlisted Newark, Nottinghamshire. Son of Mr. and Mrs. Foster, of Newark; husband of Mrs. B. Foster, of 1, Norfolk Buildings, Parker St., Newark. Buried in ST. SEVER CEMETERY EXTENSION, ROUEN, Seine-Maritime, France. Section P. Plot VII. Row N. Grave 6A.

Extract from Newark Herald - Saturday 13 April 1918, page 6:

PTE. WALTER FOSTER, NEWARK.

Another Newark victim of the German onslaught is Pte. Walter Foster, the only son of Mrs. Foster, of george-street, and husband of Mrs. Foster, of 1, Norfolk-buildings, Parker-street. Pte. Walter Foster, who was 34 years of age, was in the regulars before the war, having served his time in the Royal Garrison Artillery and had completed his period on Reserve two months before the declaration of hostilities. He was working as a machine moulder at the time, at Messrs. Ransomes, but joined the National Reserve a couple of weeks after that fatefull day in August, 1914, doing duty on the Tubular Bridge and other places. Later he joined the Notts. and Derbys and went out to France in June last. He was home on leave as recently February 14th this year. He was wounded in the abdomen on March 28th and admitted to a depot hospital at Rouen, and on Sunday morning his wife received a wire from Lichfield, informing her that he had died on April 4th. As a boy the fallen soldier was a member of St. Leonard's choir and was educated at Lovers'-lane School. Much sympathy is extended to his young widow and little girl, seven years of age.

GARDNER Harry

Private 41451, 1st/5th Battalion, Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry formerly 337934, Royal Engineers. Killed in action 17 June 1918. Aged 19. Born and resident Newark, Nottinghamshire, enlisted Derby. Son of William Ward Gardner and Minnie Gardner, of The Wheat Sheaf Inn, Slaughter House Lane, Newark, Notts. Buried in ST. VENANT-ROBECQ ROAD BRITISH CEMETERY, ROBECQ, Pas de Calais, France. Plot III. Row B. Grave 6.

Extract from Newark Herald - Saturday 29 June 1918, page 5:

DEATHS

GARDNER—Killed by a German shell, on the 17th inst., Pte. Harry Gardener, Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry, second son of Mr. and Mrs. W. Gardner, Wheat Sheaf, aged 19 years.

Duty called him, he was there,
T o do his bit and take his share,
His heart was good, his spirit brave,
His resting place a soldier's grave.

Extract from Newark Herald - Saturday 14 September 1918, page 5:

IN MEMORIAM PRESENTATION.—A greatly enlarged photograph (in a neat oak frame) of Pte. Harry Gardner, Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry, has been presented to his parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. Gardner, of the Wheat Sheaf, by the members of the Newark No. 22 Branch United Machine Workers' Association. There is a brass plate upon it, bearing the following inscription:— "A token of respect and sympathy, from the members of Newark No. 22 Branch United Machine Workers' Association." It will be, remembered that Pte. Gardner fell in action on June 17th. Mr. and Mrs. Gardner and family desire to thank the donors for their kindness and generosity.

GRANT Alma Adolphus

Lance Corporal 3194, 1st/8th Battalion, Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment). Killed in action 27 June 1916. Aged 20. Born Bedford, enlisted Newark, Nottinghamshire. Son of Joshua and Mary Alma Grant, of 14, Charles St., Newark, Notts. Buried in FONCQUEVILLERS MILITARY CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France. Plot I. Row F. Grave 22.

Extract from Newark Herald - Saturday 8 July 1916, page 2:

THANKS.—Mr. and Mrs. Jos. Grant and family, Charles-street., desire to thank their many friends for the messages received by them in their recent sad bereavement.

GRAVENEY Albert Edward John

Sergeant 305824, 2nd/8th Battalion, Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment). Killed in action 7 June 1917. Aged 19. Enlisted Newark, Nottinghamshire. Son of the late Albert Graveney and of Harriet Graveney, of Newton St., Newark-on-Trent. Buried in METZ-EN-COUTURE COMMUNAL CEMETERY BRITISH EXTENSION, Pas de Calais, France. Plot I. Row C. Grave 4.

Extract from Newark Herald - Saturday 7 July 1917, page 6:

SERGT. A. GRAVENEY. NEWARK

The sad official news from the War was received on Saturday by Mrs. Graveney, who resides at 15, Newton-street, that her son, Sergeant A. Graveney, of the Sherwood Foresters, was killed in action on June 7th. As a boy he attended the Barnby-road Council School. He was also a Patrol Leader of the 2nd Newark Scouts. Sergt. Graveney, who was only 19 years of age, prior to enlistment in October, 1914, was employed by Messrs. Ransome and Co., Ltd., as a pattern maker. He went through the Irish Rebellion, where he was wounded, and went to France in February, 1917.

Mrs. Graveney first received a letter from the Chaplain, stating that he was missing, but the following letter has now been received, saying that the body has been found: —"Dear Mrs. Graveney,—I am very sorry to tell yon that since I wrote last, your son's body has been found. He is buried the British part of a small village cemetery, not far from where he fell, and the Battalion is putting up a cross on his grave. May I assure you of my deep sympathy with you in your loss. At the same time I known you will always be proud that he gave his life in a fine way. He is very highly spoken of by both officers and men, and is greatly mmissed. May God bless you and comfort you, and grant him rest."

Mrs. Graveney desires to thank all friends for kind sympathy in her sad loss.

GUMSLEY Thomas Frederick
Private 2451, 1st/8th Battalion, Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment). Killed in action 8 August 1915. Aged 19. Enlisted Newark, Nottinghamshire. Son of Thomas and Harriett Gumsley, of 23, Parliament St., Newark, Notts. No known grave. Commemorated on YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 39 and 41.
HARDY Thomas aka Tom
Private 306015 [listed as 306051 on SDGW], 2nd/7th Battalion, Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment) formerly 3230, Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment). Killed in action between 21 March 1918 and 31 March 1918. Aged 19. Born and enlisted Newark, Nottinghamshire. Son of Mrs. Jane Hardy, of 2, Charles St., Newark, Notts. In the 1901 census he was aged 2, born Newark, Nottinghamshire, son of John T and Jane Hardy, resident 5, Cromwell Road, Newark, Newark upon Trent, Nottinghamshire. In the 1911 census he was aged 13, born Newark, Nottinghamshire, at school, son of John Taylor and Jane Hardy, resident 2, Charles Street, Newark, Newark upon Trent, Nottinghamshire. No known grave. Commemorated on ARRAS MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France. Bay 7.
HARPER James Henry

Private 12063, 8th Battalion, Leicestershire Regiment. Killed in action 25 July 1916. Aged 24. Born Hull, Yorkshire, enlisted Newark, Nottinghamshire. Son of James and Edith Jean Harper, of 85, Sleaford Rd., Newark, Notts. No known grave. Commemorated on THIEPVAL MEMORIAL, Somme, France. Pier and Face 2 C and 3 A.

Extract from Newark Herald - Saturday 05 August 1916, page 6:

ANOTHER NEWARK HERO KILLED
PRIVATE JAMES HARPER.

The name of this splendid young Newarker has to be inscribed on our Local Roll of Honour, for, at the early age of 24 years, he has given his life in the National cause-for King and Country. He is the eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. James Harper, of 85, Sleaford-road, and though he is not really one of Newark's born sons, he can be claimed as a resident, from the fact that he has lived in the town for considerably .more than half his life. Young Harper was a native of Hull, and came with his parents to Newark some fifteen years ago, when he was only nine. He attended Lovers’-lane Council school, and was a member of the Church Lads’ Brigade, as well as one of St. Leonard’s choir. At the age of 14 he entered the employment of the late Mr. Robt. Hodgkinson, at Northgate House, working in the house and in the stables. His inert abilities were recognised, and the family were advised to give him a wider opportunity of usefulness, so that, with this view, he went to the works of Messrs. Ransome and Co., and was there at the outbreak of war. He joined 3rd Leicesters in September, going with one of his shop companions. After being at a camp outside of Leicester for a few weeks, he was removed with others to Aldershot for training, and afterwards to Salisbury Plain. He was home on a few occasions, the last time being in June, a year ago, shortly after which he sailed for France, and had, therefore, been out over 12 months. He wrote regularly, always in a most cheerful strain, never uttering a single murmur, and recently he was buoyed up with the prospect of paying a visit to his parents. The last letter from him was received on June 21st, and in this he mentioned the sad death of Lieut. Barling, and also that he had been to see the grave of Alfred Savage (another Newark lad) who was just behind the trenches, and had a nice cross upon it. He concluded by saying “I am hoping to see you soon.” After that there was a field card, which was delivered to his mother after the date on which he had been killed. The first his parents heard of this dire result was from a neighbour, who had been informed from another source. That was a week last Monday, and on the following Thursday a letter came into the town from Sergt.-Major R. Mayfield, who stated “I have just seen poor Jim Harper, dead on the battlefield.” On Sunday morning last the official announcement was received from the War Office, confirming the already certain news. Mr. Harper, the father, as well as two of the deceased’s brothers, are employed at Messrs. Ransome and Co.’s works, and much sympathy is felt for the family in their sad and heavy bereavement.

HARRISON Cyril Sidney

Private 2956, 1st/8th Battalion, Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment). Killed in action 14 October 1915. Aged 19. Born and enlisted Newark, Nottinghamshire. Son of Thomas and Emma Harrison, of Sherwood Avenue, Newark, Notts. No known grave. Commemorated on LOOS MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France. Panel 87 to 89.

Extract from Newark Herald - Saturday 4 December 1915, page 8:

ANOTHER NEWARKER KILLED IN
ACTION.
PRIVATE C. S. HARRISON

After the great charge of the North Midland Division on the Hohenzollern Redoubt about six weeks ago. Captain Harrison of the Fire Brigade, and Mrs. Harrison, Cherry-holt-lane, received intimation that their youngest son, Pte. Cyril Harrison, of 1st 8th Battalion was missing. Yesterday., however, the parents, who are held in great respect in the town, received the sad notification from the War Office that their son is now reported "killed in action."

The young hero, who is only 19 year of age, after a short military career, and brief participation in the actual struggle in France. He was an old Mount School boy and was apprenticed to the fitting at Messrs. Ransome’s. He joined the 8th Battalion in November last year and was drafted to France until the beginning of last August. He was at the base for a fortnight during which he had three days on the sick list, but his parents received no further intimation from him until just prior to the charge in October, when a brief postcard chronicled the fact that they were being hurried up to the fighting line, since when the young soldier’s parents have been anxiously awaiting tidings of him, the sad news of his death being received yesterday morning.

Much sympathy will be extended to Mr. and Mrs. Harrison and family in their sad loss.

HICKSON Joseph Edward
Gunner 79925, 15th Brigade, Royal Horse Artillery. Died of wounds 12 August 1917. Aged 21. Born and enlisted Nottigham. Son of E. Hickson (now E. Whiting), of 123, Harcourt Rd., Nottingham, and the late W. H. Hickson. Buried in DOZINGHEM MILITARY CEMETERY, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot III. Row E. Grave 14.
INWARDS Ralph [Joseph]
Sergeant 8424, 1st Battalion, Lincolnshire Regiment. Died 28 March 1915. Aged 40. Son of the late Mr. and Mrs. B. Inwards, of London; husband of Fanny M. Inwards, of 8, Cross St., Newark, Notts. Buried inn RAMPARTS CEMETERY, LILLE GATE, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Row E. Grave 21.
JACKSON John Edwin
Private 27562, 1/6th Battalion (Territorial), Royal Warwickshire Regiment formerly 2878, Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment). Killed in action 4 October 1917. Born Sowfields, Lincoln, enlisted Newark, Nottinghamshire. Buried in DOCHY FARM NEW BRITISH CEMETERY, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot V. Row A. Grave 28.
JARMAN Ernest William

Private 42887, 1st/1st Battalion, Cambridgeshire Regiment formerly 49162, Leicestershire Regiment. Killed in action 5 September 1918. Born Spalding, Lincolshire, enlisted Newark, Nottinghamshire. Son of George Thomas and Sara Elizabeth Jarman, of 31, Stanley St., Newark-on-Trent. Buried in PERONNE COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION, Somme, France. Plot III. Row P. Grave 31.

Extract from Newark Herald - Saturday 21 September 1918, page 6:

OUR HONOURED DEAD
PTE. E W. JARMAN, NEWARK.

Mr. and Mrs. G. T. Jarman, of 31, Stanley-street, have received the sad intelligence that their second son, Pte. Ernest William Jarman, Cambridgeshire Regiment, 20 years of age, has been killed in action, the intelligence being conveyed to them by an Army Chaplain, who writes as follows:- "It is with deepest sympathy and sorrow that I write to you of the sad news that your son, Pte. E. W. Jarman, passed away on the 5th of this month, killed in action in front of _____. It is the more sorrowful because his cousin, Pte. H. Harman, suffered at the same time. I am the more grieved because although I have done my best, but cannot find out where they are buried. I only know that the men of another Company buried him, but I can get to know nothing definite. If you write to them Director of G.R.I.E., he may be able to give you some information, and if I can find out anything, and I will try, I will let you know personally. He was with others in charge of a machine-gun. They were coming back to cover when one of the enemy guns opened fire, and three, including your boy, were killed outright. It was impossible to bring in their bodies at the time, and soon afterwards we advanced, meanwhile some one else must have buried them, for I went all over the battle area afterwards and I could not find them anywhere. I cannot tell you how deeply sorry I am. You will feel it as only a mother can, but we mourn with you in your grievous sorrow and pray that the Lord God will give you comfort and strength to bear it bravely. Your boy was very brave, I am to tell you this—he never flinched and did what he was told to do. When some of the sadness of your pain has passed, it may be of so0me comfort to you to remember your boy was one who lived and died for others and that he is now with the Eternal life beyond the strife, fear and tears of our poor earth.” Pte. Ernest Jarman was educated at Lovers’-lane Council School, and on leaving was apprenticed as a turner at Messrs, Ransome and Co.’s, with who he remained until he enlisted in April of this year, only five months ago. When he joined the 3rd Leicesters. He went out to France only a month ago, when he was transferred to the Cambridge Regiment. His elder brother, Pte. George Charles Jarman, is in the R.E.’s and is at present in training at Conway, North Wales.

JARMAN Harold
Private 42888, 1st Battalion, Cambridgeshire Regiment formerly 49248, Leicestershire Regiment. Killed in action 5 September 1918. Born Grantham, Lincolshire, enlisted Newark, Nottinghamshire. Buried in PERONNE COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION, Somme, France. Plot III. Row P. Grave 32.

Extract from Newark Herald - Saturday 21 September 1918, page 6:

PTE. HAROLD JARMAN, NEWARK.

Official intimation of Pte. Harold Jarman's death was received on Tuesday by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. R. Jarman, 52, Sleaford-road. He was only 20 years of age. Educated at Christ Church School he was later apprenticed at Ransomes as a turner. He joined the Leicesters on April 16th and went out on 16th August and transferred to the Cambridgeshires. The sad news of his death was conveyed in a letter written by the Chaplain, who said: “It is with deep sympathy and sorrow that I write to inform you the sad news that Pte. H. Jarman passed away on the 5th of this month, killed during action in front of N——. The news is the more sorrowful because his cousin was killed at the same time. Those two brave lads were in charge of a machine-gun. Being brought under enemy machine-gun fire they were retiring when they were both hit and died instantly. Nothing could possibly be done for them; they were beyond human help. It will ne a scrap of comfort for you to know that they did not lie out in the open in lingering pain.”

Three other sons are in the Army, Pioneer Albert Jarman, in the R.E.’s in France, Sapper Robert Jarman, R.E., in Salonica, and Pte. Walter Jarman, D.L.I. Workers Battalion, who is now lent to MJessrs. Nicholsons; the latter joined the Army four years ago.

JOHNSON E
Private, Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment). No further information currently available.
KENT George

[Cannot locate on SDGW, listed as Lancashire Regiment on CWGC] Lance Corporal 30906, 1st/5th Battalion, Lancashire Regiment. Buried in BERTRANCOURT MILITARY CEMETERY, Somme, France. Plot 2. Row D. Grave 9.

Extract from Newark Herald - Saturday 13 July 1918, page 5:

OUR HONOURED DEAD

LANCE-CORPL. GEO. KENT. NEWARK

Mrs. Kent, 1, Wheatley's-yard, Chatham-street, has been officially informed that her husband, Lance-Corpl. Geo. Kent. of the East Lancs. has been killed in action. The Chaplain has written. "I am sorry to tell you that your husband was killed last night. He was one of a mining party. Whilst it must be a terrible blow for you, but may be some consolation to know that he died in the service of his country."' A Corporal also wrote, "I am writing on behalf of the men of both your husband's section and my own, and desire to offer you our deepest sympathy in your sad bereavement. Your husband was a very brave soldier and was greatly respected by all of us. His death caused quite gloom over our little party and we have missed him very much indeed. It may be of some little consolation to you to know he did not suffer at all: he died soon after he he was hit, and I can assure you everything was done to save him." Corpl. Kent. who was 28 years of age, previous to joining the Lincolns in April last year, was a machinist at Ransomes'. He went to the front in October. Much sympathy is extended to his widow and little girl in their great loss.

KNEE Reginald

Private 4018, 1st/8th Battalion, Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment). Killed in action 24 January 1917. Aged 19. Born Rugby, Warwickshire, enlisted Newark, Nottinghamshire. Only son of Rose E. Knee, of 35, Cross St., Newark. Buried in FONCQUEVILLERS MILITARY CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France. Plot I. Row F. Grave 14.

Extract from Newark Herald - Saturday 3 February 1917, page 6:

PTE. H. KNEE. NEWARK.

Mr. and Mrs. Knee, of 35, Cross-street, Newark, received the sad news on Tuesday morning that their only son, Pte. Reginald Knee, of the Sherwood Foresters, had been killed in action. Pte. Knee, who was not 20 years of age, was a scholar at Christ Church School, and afterwards a machine hand at Messrs. Ransomes. He joined the local Regiment in April, 1915, and went out to France in July last. The news of his death was conveyed to the bereaved parents in three letters from the lad’s officers. One officer wrote: “It is with the greatest regret that I write to inform you that your son was killed yesterday by a trench mortar bomb. He felt no pain as death was absolutely instantaneous. Until recently he was in my Platoon and he was always a good soldier. He was liked by officers and men, as he was always cheery and willing. A few weeks ago he was transferred to a Lewis gun team, and it was whilst doing duty with that team that he was killed. I offer you my deepest sympathy and sorrow. May it be a comfort to you that he died nobly—a soldier at his post.” His Major wrote that “he met his death in the front line trenches. Your son was one of a team of machine gunners on duty when a large trench mortar bomb burst in their midst causing a number of casualties. Your son was doing well as a soldier and I offer you my deepest sympathy in your loss, and trust it will be of some comfort to you to know that your son met his death doing his duty.” Another officer wrote: “As machine gun officer your son was practically under my control, and I found him a very keen, intelligent, and trustworthy lad. I had great hopes of his advancement, and was on the point of giving him a responsible position in his team when he was killed.”

LOWE Frederick James

Lance Corporal 2376, 1st/8th Battalion, Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment). Died of wounds 18 October 1915. Born and enlisted Newark, Nottinghamshire. Buried in CHOCQUES MILITARY CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France. Plot I. Row G. Grave 72.

Extract from Newark Herald - Saturday 13 November 1915, page 8:

CASUALTIES IN THE 8th SHERWOODS.

Official intimation was received last week by Mr. G. Lowe that his son, Lance-Corpl. Fredk. J. Lowe, of the 8th Battalion Sherwood Foresters, had died of wounds received in the magnificent charge made by the local Territorials on the Hohenzollern Redoubt. Prior to the official telegram from the War Office, Mrs. Lowe, wife of the gallant soldier, received a letter from Captain Turner, of the 8th Battalion, stating that her husband had been very seriously wounded on October 14th by a German shell. He expressed the hope, however, that he would recover, as he was an excellent fellow in every sense of the word, and an excellent soldier.

According to the telegram, Lance-Corpl F. Lowe was wounded on 14th, and died four days later. Since that time it has transpired that the local hero lost his left arm through being struck by shrapnel.

Lance-Corpl. Lowe prior to the war was employed as a moulder by Messrs. Ransome and Co., Ltd., and his wife and two children, aged eight years and two years respectively reside at 2, Eggleston' s-yard. He enlisted in the 8th Sherwood Foresters (T.F.) on September 8th, 1914, and left with his Regiment for Luton, undergoing the greater part of his training at Harpenden and Braintree He was born and bred in Newark, being the son Mr. G. Lowe, and much sympathy is extended to his wife and family in the irreparable loss they have sustained.

MASSEY Tom

Private 2274, 1st/8th Battalion, Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment). Killed in action 6 June 1915. Aged 18. Born Rochdale, Lancs, resident Leigh, Lancs, enlisted Newark, Nottinghamshire. Son of George S. Massey, of 63, Buck St., Leigh, Lancs. Buried in Buried in KEMMEL CHATEAU MILITARY CEMETERY, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Row D. Grave 61.

Extract from Newark Herald - Saturday 12 June 1915, page 8:

PROMISING NEWARK CRICKETER KILLED IN ACTION.

"Poor young Massey was killed on the 6th (Sunday), poor lad, he was quite a boy,” such was a sentence in a letter from a Newark Territorial to his parents in the town, the information being received on Thursday morning. The gallant young soldier referred to is Pte. Tom Massey, youngest son of Mr. Geo. Massey, formerly of the Queen’s Head, Market-place, and now of Leigh, Lancashire. It appears he was on sentry duty and was shot in the head, expiring immediately.

Tom Massey was of a quiet and even disposition, and will be remembered, with his full shock head of black curly hair. As a child he attended Mount School and was a member of the Parish Church choir for a long period. In his tenderest years he displayed the family love for sport, especially cricket, in which his father had accomplished many notable deeds, and at one time was in Mr. W. Tidd Pratt’s team, while later on he assisted Newark Reserve, and last season was with Averham and Kelham, with which his father was also identified. At the conclusion of his school days, Tom Massey entered the employment of Messrs. A. Ransome and Co., and was with them at the outbreak of hostilities when he was enthusiastically desirous of “doing his bit,” and, eventually, enlisted in our own territorials, the 8th Sherwood Foresters in September, and after being with the Battalion for drill at various centres, notably Braintree, he accompanied them to the front in February, after having been over to Newark for a few days’ furlough just before Christmas. Pte. Massey, who was not 19 years of age, his birthday being in October, was thorough in all he underto0ok; he was a universal favourite, and leaves many friends to regret his untimely end.

MATTHEWS Arthur Robert
Private 44271, 1st/1st Battalion, Cambridgeshire Regiment formerly 1799, Cambridgeshire Regiment. Killed in action 5 September 1918. Aged 34. Born Newark, Nottinghamshire, enlisted Derby. Husband of R. E. M. Matthews, of 42, Vernon St., Newark, Notts. Buried in PERONNE COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION, Somme, France. Plot V. Row M. Grave 19.
MORT Alexander John

[Listed as A T MORT and Private, Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment) on memorial]. Private 56605, 10th Battalion, Prince of Wales's Own (West Yorkshire Regiment). Died of wounds 17 October 1918. Aged 21. Born Bradford, Yorkshire, enlisted Newark. Son of Charles H. and Annie Wetherell Mort, of 28, Wilson St., Newark. Buried in GREVILLERS BRITISH CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France. Plot XVII. Row C. Grave 15.

Extract from Newark Herald - Saturday 26 October 1918, page 6:

OUR HONOURED DEAD.
LANCE-CORPL. A. J. MORT, NEWARK

Mr. and Mrs. C. H. Mort, Church-street, received the sad news on Tuesday that, their eldest son, Lance-Corpl. Alex J. Mort, had died at a Base Hospital on the 18th, after three days suffering from severe wounds in the head. The fallen soldier who was only 2l years of age, was educated at the Mount School. For a little time he was in the drawing office at Messrs. Ransome and Co.'s, and later entered the works. He enlisted under the Derby scheme when 18 years of age and was called up in April. Prior to that he was for three years in the Newark V.T.C., and military knowledge gained in the Corps got him his stripe immediately after joining the training squad of the West Yorks Regiment, to which he was attached in Northumberland. He was sent to France in the latter part of August and has so soon made the supreme sacrifice and lies in the Military Cemetery at Gievellers. Much sympathy is extended to the bereaved parents in their great loss.

NEWBOLD John Thomas

[Listed as J I NEWBOLD on CWGC] Private 42846, 4th Battalion, Prince of Wales's (North Staffordshire Regiment). Killed in action 15 April 1918. Aged 29. Born and enlisted Newark, Nottinghamshire. Son of Mr. T. Newbold, of 173, Northgate, Newark, Notts. Buried in HEDAUVILLE COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION, Somme, France. Row C. Grave 11.

Exract from Newark Herald - Saturday 4 May 1918, page 6:

OUR HONOURED DEAD.
PTE. J. T. NEWBOLD, NEWARK

Much sympathy is felt with Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Newbold, of 178, Northgate, in the loss they have sustained by the death of their seventh son, Pte. John Thomas Newbold, North Staffs, an official intimation having been received by them from a Records office that he has been killed in action. He was 28 years of age last Christmas, having been born in Newark, and educated at Lover’s-lane Council School. He was for some time employed at Messrs. Warwicks and Richardsons, and was latterly with Messrs. A. Ransome and Co., Stanley Works, being with them up to the time of his enlistment about six months ago, when he entered the Lincs. Regiment. He went out to France on Good Friday, and, on arriving there, was transferred to the North Staffs. Pte. Newbold was of a quiet disposition, very steady, and much respected. A brother, Pte. Wm. Newbold, who was formerly a hairdresser in Northgate, with a tobacconist’s business in Kirkgate, is with a Labour Battalion, while another one is Pte. Herbert Newbold, Sherwood Foresters, who has been invalided home from France, and a third brother, Walter Newbold, has been twice rejected.

PARKER Fred

Private 305116, 10th Battalion, Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment). Killed in action 26 August 1918. Aged 33. Born and enlisted Newark, Nottinghamshire. Husband of Emma Parker, of 2, James Row, Millgate, Newark, Notts. No known grave. Commemorated on VIS-EN-ARTOIS MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France. Panel 7.

Extract from Newark Herald - Saturday 26 October 1918, page 6:

PTE. FRED PARKER, NEWARK.

Another name to be added to the long list of the Roll of Honour of Newark men who have made the great sacrifice in the war, is that of Pte. Fred Parker, of the 1st-8th Sherwood Foresters. The gallant soldier, who as a boy attended Christ Church School, was 31 years of aged, and was one of the first dwindling band of heroes who in August, 1914, soon after the outbreak of war, marched out of Newark Market-place. He had spent three years in France, where he was twice wounded— on April 17th, 1916, and in March, 1918. His third journey to the battlefield was in July last, but he was only in France about a month, for an official notification states that he was killed in action on August 26th. Much sympathy is felt with his widow, Mrs. Parker, and her two young sons, is the great loss they have sustained.

PRIESTLEY Alfred
[Spelt PRIESTLY on SDGW] Lance Corporal 1389, 1st/8th Battalion, Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment). Died of wounds 10 May 1915. Aged 20. Born and enlisted Newark, Nottinghamshire. Son of Walter and Mary Jane Priestley, of Newark-on-Trent; husband of Ellen Fitton (formerly Priestley), of 3, Lane End's, Wheatley, Halifax, Yorks. Buried in LOKER CHURCHYARD, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot II. Row B. Grave 3.
RICHARDSON George
Private 1743, 1st/8th Battalion, Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment). Died of wounds 16 June 1915. Born and resident Calverton, Nottinghamshire, enlisted Newark, Nottinghamshire. Buried in LOKER CHURCHYARD, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot II. Row B. Grave 15.
ROBINSON Ernest Hassell

[Listed as Hassell Ernest ROBSINON on SDGW and CWGC] Lance Corporal G/11707, 7th Battalion, Queen's Own (Royal West Kent Regiment). Killed in action 13 July 1916. Born Carnaby, Yorkshire, resident and enlisted Newark, Nottinghamshire. No known grave. Commemorated on THIEPVAL MEMORIAL, Somme, France. Pier and Face 11 C.

Extract from Newark Herald - Saturday 26 August 1916, page 5:

NEWS WANTED OF WELL-KNOWN NEWARK SOLDIER.
REPORTED WOUNDED AND MISSING

Considerable and natural anxiety is being felt by Mrs. Robinson. 78, Harcourt-street, for tidings of her son. No. 11707 Lance-Corpl. H. E. Robinson, 7th Battalion Royal West Kent Regiment, at present reported wounded and missing.

He is her only son, and his age is 21. Educated at the Magnus Grammar School, he was recognised as an enthusiastic footballer and also possessed a good record for cricket. Afterwards he entered the drawing office of Messrs. Ransome and Co., where he remained for a time, and later went to Messrs. Jas. Simpson and Co., for a practical training. and, in order, in being connected with the two firms, to gain a thorough experience. Later he returned to Messrs. Ransome and Co., and was there up to a day or so prior to his enlistment on January 12th of this year in the Royal West Kent Regiment, at Chatham. He was keen on obtaining a commission, and there was every prospect of success, for his papers were up to the proper quarters; in fact his promotion was promised and was an almost certainty. He was home for a week end, having previously been advised that he would advance his interests by going to the front, and went out on June 22nd, although when he was at home he was unaware of the circumstances that he had been allocated a draft for that purpose.

Lance-Corpl. Robinson wrote home on several occasions, as well as to friends in the town, the last communication to his mother reaching here on July 9th.

The great fight at Trones Wood is now a matter of history, and it will never he forgotten how brave and enduring a part the Royal West Kent Regiment played in that grand British victory, and how they held on for 28 hours, until relieved. Lance-Corpl. Robinson showed conspicuous gallantry, as a subsequent message testifies. On August 6th a message was received by Mrs. Robinson from the War Office that her son was reported wounded and missing, and later his name appeared in the casualty list. No effort has since spared to obtain information of him and a most sympathetic letter was received from the regimental chaplain, in which he stated that this young Newarker went over the parapet with the bombers, and it was believed he was mortally wounded there. Mrs. Robinson wired, and also wrote to the Record Office, who on Sunday morning replied regretting that there was no news other than that he was missing. On Wednesday morning Mrs. Robinson had a letter from the Commanding Officer, who had been wired to, regretting that he could not tell any more than had come from the War Office, that Lance-Corpl. Robinson was missing after the fight in Trones Wood, but the mother was urged to hope for the best, and any further news will be forwarded to her at once.

As already stated, Mrs, Robinson is exceedingly anxious and is feeling the suspense most acutely, and anyone who can give information respecting her boy is urgently requested to communicate with her to 78, Harcourt-street.

SMITH Harry Edward

Lance Corporal 305571, 1st/8th Battalion, Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment). Died on service 10 July 1918. Aged 22. Enlisted Newark, Nottinghamshire. Son of Harry and Flora Mary Smith. Native of Newark-on-Trent. Buried in PERNES BRITISH CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France. Plot V. Row E. Grave 20.

Extract from Newark Herald - Saturday 7 July 1917, page 6:

PTE. H. SMITH, NEWARK. MISSING.

Mrs. Smith. of 9, Cromwell-road, Newtown, Newark, would be grateful to anyone who would give them information in regard to the fate of their son, Pte. Harry Smith, who has been reported missing since April last. Although Pte. Harry Smith joined the Sherwood Forrsters, he was transferred to the 11th Suffolk Regiment in France. It is hoped, however, that this will come to the notice of some of his former comrades in the Suffolk Regiment who will be able to give some news to his anxious parents.

TAILBY John James

Private 105698, 10th Battalion, Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment). Killed in action 4 November 1918. Aged 41. Born Toddington, Beds, enlisted Newark, Nottinghamshire. Son of J. Tailby; husband of Mary Lizzie Tailby, of 15, Stanley St., Newark-on-Trent, Notts. Buried in GHISSIGNIES BRITISH CEMETERY, Nord, France. Row A. Grave 37.

Extract from Newark Herald - Saturday 4 January 1919, page 6:

OUR HONOURED DEAD.
PTE. J. J. TAILBY, NEWARK.

Although the Armistice has been signed, the sad news of local fallen men keeps coming through, and Mrs. Tailby, of 15, Stanley-street, bar received information that her husband, Pte. John James Tailby, 41 years of age, of the 10th Battalion Sherwood Foresters, has been killed in action. There was an official intimation, first of all, that be had been wounded, and the week before Christmas there was another message from the War Office informing her that he had died in action. Mrs. Tailby has instituted numerous inquiries, but up to the present time no details are forthcoming as to the exact circumstances of what occurred, though she is hoping to hear more shortly. Pte. Tailby was a native of Doddington, near Bedford, and for many years he occupied the position of butler to Mrs. Browne, of Collingham. After the outbreak of war he felt that he ought to do something of national importance, but owing to the death of the only child in 1915, he, naturally, wished to remain with his wife, which led him to seek and obtain munition work with Messrs. Ransome and Marles, when he went to reside in Stanley-street. However, the call to greater service still appealed to him, and at the beginning of last April he joined the 4th Battalion Sherwood Foresters, and went into training at Sunderland. He went overseas on August 3rd, and practically straight into action, remaining there nearly continuously up to the time he was stricken down. He had written to his wife regularly, and, when his letters ceased to arrive, Mrs. Taillby was convinced that something serious had befallen him, a deduction which, unfortunately, proved to be only too true. While living in Newark he attended the Parish Church every Sunday morning up to the time of his departure to enlist in the 4th Sherwood Foresters, from which he was subsequently transferred to the 10th Battalion. He was greatly respected, and much sympathy is felt with the widow in her loneliness as the result of a cruel bereavement.—Mrs. Tailby desires to thank all friends for kind sympathy in her sad loss.

TYERS Leslie

Private 2366, 1st/8th Battalion, Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment). Killed in action 20 June 1916. Aged 19. Born Hucknall Torkard, Nottinghamshire, enlisted Newark, Nottinghamshire. Son of Harry and Hetty Tyers, of 36, Harcourt St., Newark-on-Trent. Buried in FONCQUEVILLERS MILITARY CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France. Plot I. Row F. Grave 30.

Extract from Newark Herald - Saturday 1 July 1916, page 6:

MORE LOCAL CASUALTIES.
NEWARKERS KILLED WHILST TAKING RATIONS.

Whilst taking rations up to the Sherwood Foresters in thy front line of trenches on June 26th, san enemy shell dropped amongst the fatigue party, unfortunately taking toll of five lives (amongst them two Newark men), and wounding several others. The two young heroes concerned are Pte. Leslie Tyers, aged 19, eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Tyers, 36. Harcourt-street, and Pte. Albert Edward Pulford, eldest son of Mrs. Pulford. 65, Bowbridge-road.

The first intimation of the sad intelligence was received in a letter sent by Corporal Ernest Cross to his parents in William-street. The letter, dated June 21st. after stating that the Battalion had been in the trenches 18 days, came out for what was expected as a month's rest, but went in again after ten days, continues: “l have been upset today, as I have been helping to dig graves for six men. I am sorry to say two of them are from Newark, and one from Farnsfield or Southwell. One if young Pulford, out of Bowbridge-road, whose father used to be at Perfect’s shop in the Marketplace. The other young chap lives, I think, in Barnbygate. His father is a shoe maker names Tyers. They were carrying dinner up the trench, when a shell dropped amongst them, killing five and wounding three.”

Corpl. Cross asked his parents to see the people referred to and inform them the graves of the young heroes are being cared for, with a cross to mark the spot. Corpl Cross remarks that he was taking another party up just as the young men were killed.

Pte. Tyers, as a boy, attended the Wesleyan Day School, and the London-road Congregational Church, where he as for many years in the choir, and also a member of the Rev. J. D. Burns’ Bible Class. After leaving school he was apprenticed as a turner at the Stanley Works (Messrs. A. Ransome and Co. Ltd.), and joined the Sherwood Foresters on September 9th, 1914. He went to Harpenden and Braintree, and was with the first boat-load to land in France in the following February. His parents had the satisfaction of seeing him home on a short furlough, from which he returned a month ago, and as an indication of his cheery correspondence under difficult circumstances, it may be mentioned that he said he caught cold in travelling, but was better since he had “settled down in the trenches!” He had since sent a letter and a field card to say he was well. In a letter received last Saturday, he stated the Battalion was in the trenches, and that his company was in reserve, taking up the rations, so it was better than being in the front line. It is a pathetic feature, however, that it was the men with the rations who received the unlucky shell.

A memorial service for Pte. Tyers and for five others connected with the Church who have died, will be held tom-morrow evening in the London-road Congregational Church at 6.30.

Mr. and Mrs. Tyers and family wish to thank all friends for their kind expressions of sympathy and letters of condolence.

VACEY Robert

Lance Corporal 305887, 1st/8th Battalion, Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment). Killed in action 23 April 1917. Born and enlisted Newark, Nottinghamshire. Baptised 15 December 1889 in Newark-on-Trent, St Mary Magdalene, son of Joseph and Lucy Vasey. In the 1891 census he was aged 1, born Newark, Nottinghamshire, son of Joseph and Lucy Vasey, resident Malt Kiln Terrace, Newark upon Trent, Newark, Nottinghamshire. In the 1901 census he was aged 11, born Newark, Nottinghamshire, son of Joseph and Lucy Vasey, resident 3, Maltkiln Terrace, Newark, Newark upon Trent, Nottinghamshire. In the 1901 census he was aged 21, born Newark, Nottinghamshire, a Chemical labourer, son of Joseph and Lucy Vasey, resident 3, Maltkiln Terrace, Newark, Newark upon Trent, Nottinghamshire. No known grave. Commemorated on ARRAS MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France. Bay 7.

WILKINSON Horace
Private 2365, 1st/8th Battalion, Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment). Killed in action 14 October 1915. Born and enlisted Newark, Nottinghamshire. No known grave. Commemorated on LOOS MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France. Panel 87 to 89.
YOUNG Charles
[Listed as Private on memorial] Private 305875, 2nd/8th Battalion, Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment). Killed in action 31 October 1917. Aged 19. Born Devonport, Devon, resident Codington, Nottinghamshire, enlisted Newark, Nottinghamshire. Son of Mrs. Ellen Young, of 28, Lombard St., Newark-on-Trent, Notts. Buried in CABARET-ROUGE BRITISH CEMETERY, SOUCHEZ, Pas de Calais, France. Plot XV. Row N. Grave 39.

Sources used in the creation of this page:

www.findmypast.co.uk, www.cwgc.org, www.iwm.org.uk/memorials, www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk, www.ancestry.co.uk

Last updated 9 October, 2021

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