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British Legion
The Royal British Legion

GODALMING, CHARTERHOUSE SCHOOL MEMORIAL CHAPEL

World War 1 & 2 - Detailed information compiled by Eric Webb & Chris Wheeler 2008-2009
Copyright © Charterhouse School 2008
Extra detail Martin Edwards & Mal Murray

GREAT WAR 1914-1918
SURNAMES S

SACKVILLE

Gilbert George Reginald

See DE LA WARR, Earl.

SALMON

Claud Garrett

Captain, 3rd Battalion, attached 2nd Battalion, Cameronians (Scottish Rifles). Killed in action 9 May 1915. Aged 39. Born 8 April 1876. Baprised 30 May 1876 in Bury St Edmunds, St James, Suffolk, resident 26 Angel Hill, Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk. Son of Charles Edward and Josephine Helen Salmon, of Bury St. Edmund's. In the 1881 census he was aged 4, born Bury St Edmunds, son of Charles E and Josephine H Salmon, resident 26, Angel Hill, Bury St Edmunds St James, Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk. In the 1891 census he was aged 14, born Bury St Edmunds, Suffrolk, school boarder, Charterhouse, W Moss, Prince of Wales Road, Godalming, Guildford, Surrey. Buried in RUE-PETILLON MILITARY CEMETERY, FLEURBAIX, Pas de Calais, France. Plot II. Row M. Grave 14. See also Aldeburgh War Memorial, Suffolk

Extract from the Charterhouse Register, Oration Quarter 1890:

Salmon, Claud Garrett. b. 8 April, 1876. (Lockites); Left C.Q., 1894. - Joined 2nd V.B. Suffolk Regt., 1900; served in S. African War with 18th Batt. I.Y., 1901; Hon. Lieut. in Army, 1903.
C. G. Salmon, Esq., Risby Gate, Bury St. Edmunds.

Extract from England & Wales Government Probate Death Index 1915:

SALMON Claud Garrett of Nairobi in British East Africa died 9 May 1915 in France on active service Probate London 23 September to Alan Garrett Anderson ship owner. Effects £164 11s. 3d.

SAMSON

Philip Edward

[Listed as Lieutenant on SDGW] Second Lieutenant, 1st/5th Battalion (Territorial), The King's (Liverpool Regiment). Died of wounds 21 October 1918. Born 18 October 1886. In the 1891 census he was aged 4, born Broughton, Lancashire, son of Charles L and Margaret A Samson, resident Carmona, Cavendish Road, Broughton, Salford, Lancashire. In the 1911 census he was aged 24, born Manchester, Lancashire, no occupation, son of Charles Leopold Samson, resident 23, Lancaster Gate W., Paddington, London & Middlesex. Admitted to Queen Alexandra's Military Hospital at Millbank 30 August 1917 with a carbuncle on his neck, discharged to duty 2 October 1917. Buried in CAMBRIN MILITARY CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France. Row Q. Grave 28

Extract from the Charterhouse Register, Cricket Quarter 1900:

Samson, Philip Edward. b. 18 Oct., 1886. (Daviesites).
P. E. Samson, Carmona, Kersal, Manchester.

Extract from Wigan Observer and District Advertiser - Thursday 9 March 1916, page 2:

MILITARY APPOINTMENTS.

The London Gazette on Tuesday night contained the following

Territorial Force—Lancashire Hussars ; Philip Edward Samson to be second-lieutenant (on probation).

Extract from Western Times - Wednesday 3 July 1918, page 4:

Lieutenant's Extravagance Leads to Bankruptcy

Lieut. Philip Edward Samson, who attributed his present position to wild and reckless extravagance, including betting losses, was publicly examined at the London Bankruptcy Court yesterday. Accounts filed under the proceedings disclosed liabilities of £31,576, of which £26,521 was in respect of jewellery purchased by him. There are no assets.

SANDERSON

Frederick Borthwick aka Fred

Second Lieutenant, "C" Battery, 258th Brigade, Royal Field Artillery. Died of wounds 10 August 1916 [wounded on 4 August 1916]. Aged 27. Native of Edinburgh. Son of Fredeick Reid Sanderson and Alice H. Scott Sanderson, of 18, Campden Hill Court, Kensington, London; brother of Harold Scott Sanderson (below). Educated Edinburgh Academy; Charterhouse. University of Edinburgh. B.A. (Cambridge). Student of Medicine, 1911-14. OTC Artillery, February 1913 to September 1914, Cadet. RFA, 1st Lowland Brigade, 2nd Lieutenant September 1914; Lieutenant France Spring 1916. Buried in ST. SEVER CEMETERY, ROUEN, Seine-Maritime, France. Officers Plot A. Row G. Grave 8.

Extract from De Ruvigny's Roll of Honour 1914-1918, volume 2, page 268:

SANDERSON, FREDERICK BORTHWICK, B.A., 2nd Lieut., 1st Lowland Brigade, R.F.A. (T.F.), s. of Frederick Reid Sanderson, of 5, Glencairn Crescent, Edinburgh, Distiller, by his wife, Alice Helen, dau. of the late Thomas Scott; and brother to Lieut. H. S. Sanderson (q.v.); b. Comrie, co. Perth, 15 June, 1889; educ. Charterhouse; Caius College, Cambridge, where he graduated B.A. in April, 1912, and was a Medical Student at Edinburgh University when war broke out; volunteered for foreign service, and obtained a 2nd Lieutenancy in the R.F.A., 7 Sept. 1914; served with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders from May, 1916, and died in hospital at Rouen 10 Aug. 1916, from wounds received in action at Mametz Wood. Buried in the Cemetery at St.. Sever, Rouen. He was a good all-round athlete, excelling at golf; unm.

SANDERSON

Harold Scott

Lieutenant, 8th Battalion, Black Watch (Royal Highlanders). Killed in action 25 September 1915. Aged 22. Son of Frederick Reid Sanderson and Alice Helen Scott Sanderson, of 5, Glencairn Crescent, Edinburgh; brother of Frederick Borthwick Sandrson (above). In the 1901 census he was aged 8, born Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland, son of Frederick R and Alice H Sanderson, resident Carlton Terrace, 5, Edinburgh, St Andrew, Midlothian, Scotland. No known grave. Commemorated on LOOS MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France. Panel 78 to 83.

Extract from De Ruvigny's Roll of Honour 1914-1918, volume 2, page 268-269:

SANDERSON, HAROLD SCOTT, Lieut., 8th (Service) Battn. The Black Watch (Royal Highlanders), 3rd s. of Frederick Reid Sanderson, of 5, Glencairn Crescent, Edinburgh, Distiller, by his wife, Alice Helen, dau. of Thomas Scott; and brother to 2nd Lieut. F. B. Sanderson (q.v.); b. Edinburgh, 24 Sept. 1892; educ. Charterhouse, and subsequently entered his father's firm of business, Messrs. Robertson, Sanderson & Co., Ltd., Leith; volunteered for foreign service on the outbreak of war, and obtained a commission as 2nd Lieut. Black Watch, 31 Aug. 1914, being promoted Lieut. June, 1915; served with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders from May, 1915, and was killed in action at the Battle of Loos 25 Sept. following. Buried at Vermelles. While at Charterhouse he distinguished himself at games, being in the cricket and football elevens, also represented the school at fives and won his racquets cap; unm.

Extract from England & Wales Government Probate Death Index 1916:

SANDERSON Harold Scott of 5 Glencairn-crescent Edinburgh temporary lieutenant Royal Highlanders died 25 September 1915 in North West Europe killed in action Confirmation of Alice Helen Scott or Sanderson.
Sealed London 18 January.

Extract from The Scotsman - Monday 4 October 1915, page 10:

LIEUT . HAROLD SCOTT SANDERSON

Lieutenant Harold Scott Sanderson, 8th Batt. The e Black Watch, killed in action in France, received his commission in August 1914 , and was promoted Lieutenant last July. He was in his 23rd year, and was educated at Charterhouse, where he represented the school at cricket, football, and fives, and also won his rackets cap. He was in business with the firm of Messrs Robertson, Sanderson & Co. (Ltd.), Leith, and was the younger son of Mr. F. R. Sanderson, 5 Glencairn Crescent, Edinburgh.

Extract from Dundee Evening Telegraph - Tuesday 5 October 1915, page 4:

Mr H. S. Sanderson, 8th Black Watch.

Lieutenant Harold Scott Sanderson, 8th Black Watch, who was killed in action in France on September 26-27, aged 22, was the younger son of Mr F. R. Sanderson, 5 Glencairn Crescent, Edinburgh, the old Royal High School (F.P.'s) and Scottish international cricketer. Lieutenant Sanderson was educated Charterhouse, where he had a place in the football and cricket elevens, and also distinguished himself at racquets and fives. After leaving he joined the Grange Cricket Club, and became one of their most reliable batsmen. He was in civil life attached to the firm of Robertson, Sanderson, & Co. (Limited), wine merchants, Leith, of which his father is a director.

Extract from Edinburgh Evening News - Monday 4 October 1915, page 3:

Lieut. Harold Scott Sanderson, 8th Black Watch, who has been killed in action in France, received his commission in August, 1914. He was in business with the firm Messrs Robertson, Sanderson, & Co. (Ltd.), Leith, and was the younger son Mr F. R. Sanderson, 5 Glencairn Crescent, Edinburgh.

Extract from Sheffield Daily Telegraph - Wednesday 6 October 1915, page 4:

Lieutenant Harold Scott Sanderson, 8th Black Watch, who was killed in action in France on September 26-27, aged 22, was the younger son of Mr. F. R. Sahderson, 5, Glencairn Crescent. Edinburgh, the old Royal High School (F.P.’s) and Scottish International cricketer. Lieutenant Sanderson was educated at Charterhouse, where he had a place in the football and cricket elevens, and also distinguished himself at racquets and fives.

SANDWITH, FRCP,CMG

Fleming Mant (Dr.)

Temporary Colonel, R.A.M.S. Born 11 October 1853, the son of Colonel John William Fleming Sandwith (D.S.O.) and Ethel Sandwith, husband of Gladys Sandwith who he married in the October to December Quarter 1891 in Kensington Registration District, London. Baptised 17 November 1853 in Belgaum, Bombay (India). He was at Charterhouse [S] 1866 - 1869, i.e. before the School moved to Godalming, hence his name is not included in the Carthusian Register 1872 - 1931. In the 1911 census he was aged 57, born Bombay, India, Physcian, married to Gladys with two daughters and one son, resident 31 Cavendish Square, St Marylebone, London & Middlesex. Not listed in the C.W.G.C. Register. In the Medical Register 1913 he was listed as qualifying 1 December 1876, a Member of the Royal College of Surgeons from 1876, Licenced 1877, Fellow of the Royal College of Phsyician, London, 1900; receved his M.D. at Durham University 1893. Volunteered as a Physician at The King George Hospital, London, from 25 May 1915 to 20 November 1915. The Times of 7 December 1915 reports him as for many years Professor of Medicine at the Egyptian Government Medical School and currently Gresham Professor of Physic and Senior Physician at the London School for Tropical Medicine; he had been appointed Consulting Physician with His Majesty’s troops in the Mediterranean and was leaving shortly for Egypt. Admitted to 19th General Hospital 7 April 1916 with Plurisy, discharged 17 April 1916. Admitted to Queen Alexandra's Military Hospital at Millbank 1917 with paralysis of left arm and left thigh, discharged and transferred to 26 Park Lane, London 17 November 1917. The issue of the Times 20 February 1918 carries a full obituary; he had died suddenly on 17 February 1918 in his 65th year at a convalescent home in Bournemouth having ‘broken down in health after two years of very hard and continuous work in Egypt’. His 2nd son was in Saunderites 1916 - 1920. Grave location unknown. Also commemorated on University of Durham War Memorial and the Medical School War Memorial, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Tyne And Wear.

Extract from England & Wales Government Probate Death Index 1918:

SANDWITH Fleming Mant of 31 Cavendish-square Middlesex died 18 February 1918 at Wentworth Lodge Boscombe Bournemouth Probate London 13 April to Gladys Sandwith widow and the Public ,Trustèe. Effects £11279 2s. 5d.

Extract from The Times, Tuesday 7 December 1915, page 9:

MEDITERRANEAN TROOPS.
NEW CONSULTANT APPOINTED.

Dr. F. M. Sandwith, Gresham Professor of Physic and Senior Physician to the London School of Tropical Mledicine, has been appointed Consulting Physician with his Majesty's troops in the Mediterranean, and is leaving shortly for Egypt.

Dr. Sandwith for many years held the appointment of Professor of Medicine at the Egyptian Govermment Medical School.

Extract from The Times, Wednesday 20 February 1918, page 9:

DR. FLEMING SANDWITH

Dr. Fleming Sandwith, C.M.G., temporary colonel in the R.A.M.S., died very suddenly on Sunday, in his 60th year [sic], at a convalescent home at Bournemouth. He had broken down in health, after two years of very hard and continuous work in Egypt. It was thought that two months' rest in England had set him on the road to recovery, and the news of his death will come as a painful surprise to his many friends. He was the son of Colonel J. W. F. Sandwith, and married Gladys, daughter of his second cousin, Dr. Hunphry Sandwith, of Kars, by whom he had two sons, one a lieutenant in the Navy, and two daughters, one married to Squadron-Commander Maude, of the R.N.A.S.

Few medical men could show such a record of military services. Before the present war Dr. Sandwith had worked with ambulances in the Turko-Serbian War (1876) and in the Russo-Turkish War of the following years; he had been on Baker Pasha's Staff and senior physician to the Imperial Yeomanry Hospital in the South African War. His close connexion with Egypt began in 1883, when he volunteered to fight the cholera epidemic; and laid the foundations of his great knowledge of tropical and Oriental diseases. During the years between the South African War and 1914 Dr. Sandwith worked chiefy in London, where he was at various times Gresham Professor of Physic, Lecturer at St. Thomas's, and senior physician at the Albert Dock Hospital for Tropical Diseases. His strictly military service during the present war covered two years, from December, 1915, including two hot seasons in Egypt, during which he took no rest. He was placed on the retired list a few weeks ago.

SCHILL

Edward Melland

Lieutenant, 21st Battalion attached to 17th Battalion, Lancashire Fusiliers. Died of wounds at No. 5 Casualty Clearing Station, near Trones Wood, Somme, France, 25 August 1916. Born 27 March 1891. Aged 25. Son of Charles Henry and Millicent Schill, of Croston Towers, Alderley Edge, Cheshire. Educated at Charterhouse and Christ Church College, Oxford (studied History), matriculated 1908, B.A. In the 1891 census he was aged 10, born Cheadle, Cheshire, son of Charles H and Millicent Schill, resident Broome House, Didsbury, Chorlton, Lancashire. Buried in CORBIE COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION, Somme, France. Plot 2. Row B. Grave 72. Also commemorated on Christ Church College War Memorial, Oxford and Schill Brothers Limited Roll of Honour, Manchester, and also Alderley Edge War Memorial, Cheshire.

Extract from De Ruvigny's Roll of Honour 1914-1918, volume 2, page 270:

SCHILL, EDWARD MELLAND, Lieut., 15th (Service) Battn. (1st Salford) The Lancashire Fusiliers, eldest and only surv. s. of Charles Henry Schill, of Croston Towers. Alderlev Edge. Chairman of Messrs. Schill Brothers. Ltd., Shipping Merchants, Manchester; by his wife, Millicent, dau. of William Edward Melland, of Middleton Hall, co. Derby; b. Cheadle, co. Chester, 27 March, 1891; educ. Bilton Grange; Charter-house, and Christ Church College, Oxford Scholar), where he obtained a First Class in the History Honours School; subsequently joined the firm of Messrs. Schill Brothers, Ltd., and was in Valparaiso when war broke out; returned to England; volunteered for service, and was gazetted 2nd Lieut. Lancashire Fusiliers 14 Dec. 1914, being promoted Lieut. April, 1916; remained in England training recruits in musketry for a time, owing to health reasons; served with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders from June, 1916, and died in No. 5 Casualty Clearing Station 24 Aug. following, from wounds received in action on the Somme the same day. Buried in the Military Cemetery at Corbie. His Commanding Officer wrote: "I heard this morning that he has died of wounds received whilst leading his men forward in a very gallant advance. It may perhaps help just a lttle to know that the advance in which he played so worthy a part was completely successful. We—myself, as his Commanding Officer, his fellow officers and his men—can only express to you our deepest sympathy. During the time your son has been with us he had made himself a favourite with all ranks with his charming disposition and his soldierly qualities. I saw him as he was being carried out, he was splendidly brave, and smiled at me and apologized for being hit. That is the sort of man he was." Unm.

Extract from England & Wales Government Probate Death Index 1916:

SCHILL Edward Melland of Croston Towers Alderley Edge Cheshire lieutenant 21st battalion Lancashire Fusiliers died 25 August 1916 in France on active service Probate London 25 October to Charles Henry Schill and Paul Hermann Schill merchants. Effects £1302 10s. 8d.

Extract from Manchester Evening News - Tuesday 29 August 1916, page 2:

DIED OF WOUNDS.

Lieutenant EDWARD MELLAND SCHILL died on August 25 of wounds received the same day. He was 25 years of age, and was the eldest and only surviving son of Mr. and Mrs. C. H. Schill, Croston Towers, Alderley Edge. Educated at Bilton Grange and Charterhouse, he took an open scholarship to Christ Church, Oxford, where he took a first class in History Honours School. He joined the firm of Messrs. Schill Bros., Ltd., and was in Valparaiso on the outbreak of war, but returned and was given a commission in the Lancashire Fusiliers in December, 1914.

SCHUSTER

Alfred Felix

Lieutenant, 4th (Queen's Own) Hussars. Killed in action 20 November 1914 [SDGW states 30 November 1914]. Aged 31. Born 30 July 1883. Son of Ernest Schuster. In the 1891 census he was aged 7, born Hampstead, Middlesex, a scholar, son of Ernest J and Hilda Schuster, resident Bouverie Road, Folkestone, Elham, Kent. Educated Caherterhouse. Matriculated 1901 New College, Oxford, M.A. In the 1911 census he was aged 27, born Hampstead, London, a Barrister-at-Law, staying at the White Hart Hotel, Cricklade, Wiltshire. at No known grave. Commemorated on YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 5. Also commemorated on New College War Memorial, Oxford and also St Brendans Church War Memorial, Brendon, Devon.

Extract from the Charterhouse Register, Oration Quarter 1896:

Schuster, Alfred Felix. b. 30 July, 1883. (Gownboys); Junior & Senior Scholar; Left L.Q., 1901. Exhibitioner of New Coll., Oxford.
A. F. Schuster, Esq., 12, Harrington Gardens, S.W.

Extract from Bond of Sacrifice: Officers Died in the Great War 1914-1916, volume 1, page 351:

LIEUTENANT ALFRED F. SCHUSTER, SPECIAL RESERVE, 4th (QUEEN'S OWN) HUSSARS, was born in Hampstead on the 30th July, 1883, and was the son of Ernest J. Schuster, Barrister-at-Law.

He was educated first at Stoke House, Stoke Poges, and then at Charterhouse, where he held junior and senior scholarships; and finally he was an Exhibitioner of New College, Oxford, where he took a second class in Moderations and a second class in Lit. Human.

Lieutenant Schuster joined the Kerry Militia in July, 1905, as 2nd Lieutenant, being promoted Lieutenant in August, 1908, and when the Militia was disbanded was transferred to the 4th Hussars Special Reserve in July, 1910. He was serving with the 4th Hussars when he was killed on the 20th November, 1914, in the most advanced trench at Hooge, near Ypres. Lieutenant Schuster was called to the Bar in 1906, and joined the publishing firm of Sidgwick and Jackson in 1913. He was a member of the New University Club, the Cavendish Club, and the Garrick. He hunted with the Quorn, V.W.H. Devon and Somerset Staghounds, and won the Bar Point-to-point Lightweight Race in 1908.

Extract from De Ruvigny's Roll of Honour 1914-1918, volume 4, page 179:

SCHUSTER, ALFRED F., Lieut., 4th Hussars, yst. s. of Dr. Ernest Schuster, of 12, Harrington Gardens, South Kensington, S.W.; served with the Expreditionary Force in France and Flanders, and was killed in action 20 Nov. 1914.

Extract from England & Wales Government Probate Death Index 1915:

SCHUSTER Alfred Felix of 12 Harrington-gardens Middlesex died 20 November 1914 at Hague Belgium Administration London 2 March to Ernest Joseph Schuster barrister.
Effects £27316 1s. 10d.

Extract from Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer - Thursday 26 November 1914, page 4:

Lieut. Alfred Felix Schuster, another officer whose name appears this morning in the list of killed was a barrister-at-law, and a partner in the publishing firm of Messrs. Sidgwick and Jackson. He was born in 1881, and was the youngest son of Dr. and Mrs. Ernest Schuster. of 12, Harrington Gardens. S.W. Formerly in the Militia he was transferred, on its abolition to the Special Reserve of the 4th Hussars.

Extract from Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer - Thursday 26 November 1914, page 4:

Losses at the War.

So widely is the City of London represented in our Army at the front that almost of necessity scarcely a day passes without news of the loss of those who are either well known in the City or are related to those prominent in banking and finance. To-day the many friends of Sir Felix Schuster were grieved to learn of the news just to hand of the death of his nephew, Alfred Felix Schuster, a lieutenant in the 4th Hussars, who was killed in action on the 20th of this month. He was the son of Dr. Ernest Schuster, and was a young fellow of the greatest promise.

Extract from Birmingham Daily Post - Saturday 6 March 1915, page 11:

LATEST WILLS

Among latest wills proved are the following:—

Lieutenant Alfred Felix Schuster, of 12 Harrington Gardens, London, of the 4th Hussars. His death occurred on active service at Hogue on November 20 (net personalty £22,258) ...............................

£27,316

Extract from The Scotsman - Saturday 6 March 1915, page 8:

SCOTTISH AND OTHER WILLS

Lieutenant Alfred Felix Schuster, aged 31, 4th Hussars, of 12 Harrington Gardens, S.W., formerly of the Kerry Militia, barrister-at-law, who was killed in action at Hogue, Belgium, on the 20th November last, intestate and a bachelor. Unsettled estate. Net personalty, £22,258 ; gross ...............................

£27,316

SCOTT

Bernard

Lieutenant Bernard Scott
© IWM (HU 126262)
Born 2 January 1896 in Bournemouth, he was one of ten children of Bernard (a surgeon) and Lydia M. Scott, of "St. Wilfrid's", St. Michael's Rd., Bournemouth. He attended Saugeen Preparatory School in Bournemouth before going to Charterhouse as a Junior Scholar in the Oration Quarter in 1909. Here he became Head of School and took a full part in school life, sport, the debating society and the Rifle Corps. He was awarded a Top Open Scholarship to read Classics at University College, but volunteered when war broke out, and was Commissioned in the 15th (City of London) Battalion (Prince of Wales Own Civil Service Rifles), London Regiment and attained the rank of Lieutenant. He was wounded in June 1915, suffered from jaundice and was admitted to Queen Alexandra's Military Hospital at Millbank on 24 September 1915 until discharged to Mason Hospital 30 September 1915; later killed on 21 May 1916, aged 20, leading an attack on German Trenches on Vimy Ridge. No known grave. Commemorated on ARRAS MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France. Bay 10.

He is commemorated not only at Charterhouse School, in the Chapel designed by a relative, Sir Giles Gilbert Scott, but on Sway Village War Memorial having spent part of his boyhood there. His name is also inscribed on the Roll of Honour in Bournemouth Town Hall.

His sister, Elisabeth Whitworth Scott was also an Architect and known for her design of the Shakespeare Memorial Theatre in Stratford on Avon, opened in 1932.

SCOTT

George Henry Hall

Captain, "C" Company, 7th Battalion, The Queen's (Royal West Surrey Regiment). Killed in action 1 July 1916. Aged 34. Born 18 June 1882. Native of Northumberland. Baptised 2 September 1882 in Ellingham, Northumberland,. Son of Sir Henry Hall Scott and Henrietta Eaukreser, his wife, of 17, Stratton St., Piccadilly, London. In the 1891 census he was aged 8, born Alnham, Northumberland, a pupil, son of Henry Hall and Henrieeta Scott, resident Hipsburn, Lesbury, Alnwick, Northumberland. In the 1911 census he was aged 28, born Alnwick, Northumberland, a Consulting mining engineer, son of Sir Henry Hall and Lady Henrietta Scott, resident Hipsburn, Lesbury, Northumberland. Buried in DANTZIG ALLEY BRITISH CEMETERY, MAMETZ. Somme, France. Plot VIII. Row R. Grave 3.

Extract from the Charterhouse Register, Oration Quarter 1896:

Scott, George Henry Hall. b. 18 June, 1882. (Verites); Left C.Q., 1900.- Mining Engineer.
G. H. H. Scott, Esq., Hipsburn Lesbury, Northumberland.

Extract from England & Wales Government Probate Death Index 1916:

SCOTT George Henry Hall of Down-place Guildford captain 7th battalion Queen's Royal West Surrey regiment died July 1916 in France on active service Probate London 8 September to dame Henrietta Scott widow and Thomas Emerson Forster mining engineer. Effects £73625 3s. 6d.

Extract from Westminster Gazette - Tuesday 12 September 1916, page 9:

TO-DAY'S WILLS

Captain George Henry Hall Scott, Royal West Surrey Regiment, killed in France on July 1, left estate of the value of £73,625, the net personalty being £68,516.

Extract from West Sussex Gazette - Thursday 21 September 1916, page 2:

LOCAL WILLS

Captain George Henry Hall Scott, Royal West Surrey Regiment, of Down Place, Guildford, Surrey, mining engineer, a director of the Bolsover and Blackwell Colleries, Derby, and the New Biggs Colliery, Northumberland, who was killed in France on July 1, younger sou of the late Sir Henry Hall Scott. of Hipsburn, Lesbury, Northumberland, left estate value £73,625.

Extract from Westminster Gazette - Tuesday 12 September 1916, page 9:

Captain George Henry Hall Scott.

Captain George Henry Hall who has been killed in action, was the youngest son of the late Sir Henry Hall Soott, Hipsburn, Lesbury, Northumberland, and of Eilanreach, Inverness-shire, and of Lady Scott, Down Place, Guildford. He was born in 1882, and educated at Aysgarth and Charterhouse. He received his commission in September, 1914.

Extract from Derbyshire Courier - Saturday 16 September 1916, page 4:

Captain George Henry Hall Scott, Royal West Surrey Regiment, mining engineer, director of the Bolsover and Blackwell Collieries, and the New Biggs Colliery, Northumberland, who was killed im France I July last, left £73,625.

Extract from The Scotsman - Monday 17 September 1917, page 7:

MEMORIAL WINDOW.—In St Mary's the Parish Church of Lesbury, Northumberland , three stained glass windows have been placed by Lady Scott in memory of her husband, Sir Henry Hall Scott , and of their son, Captain George Henry Hall Scott, Queen's Royal West Surrey Regiment, who was killed on July 1, 1916, in the Battle of the Somme. In the church will shortly be placed by the colonel and remaining officers of the original 7th Queen's , a brass to Captain Scott's memory.

Extract from Surrey Advertiser - Monday 17 September 1917, page 1:

MEMORIAL WINDOWS .

Three beautiful stained glass windows have been placed in St. Mary’s Church, Lesbury, Northumberland, by Lady Scott, of Down Place, Guildford, to the memory of her husband, Sir Henry Hall Scott, and of her son, Captain George Henry Hall Scott, The Queen’s Royal West Surrey Regiment, who was killed on July 1, 1916, at the battle of the Somme.

The central window represents an angel holding out the Crown of Life, whilst St. George of England and Joan of Arc are the subjects of the windows on either side. Below St. George there is a small battle scene, in which the British are seen advancing to their objective—Montauban, which The Queen’s, with other regiments, took on the day Captain Scott died. The colonel and remaining officers of the original 7th Queen’s will shortly place a brass in the church to the memory of Capt. Scott.

The members of the Sergeants’ Mess of the Depot, East Surrey Regiment, with their wives, families and friends, had a very enjoyable up-river trip Thursday. The party, numbering about 60, started from Kingston shortly before 10, and journeyed as far as Egham and Staines, returning about eight. Dinner and tea was served board, and the pleasure of the trip was enhanced by music, games, etc.

Extract from The Scotsman - Saturday 15 July 1916, page 8, and Berwick Advertiser - Friday 14 July 1916, page 5:

CAPT . GEORGE H . K . SCOTT.

Capt. George Henry Hall Scott , the Queen's Royal West Surrey Rgt. (killed) , was the younger son of the late Sir Henry Hall Scott , Hipsburn, Northumberland, and of Eilanreach, Inverness, and of Lady Scott, Down Place, Guildford, Surrey. He was born in 1882, and educated at Aysgarth and Charterhouse. He received his commission in September 1914 and went to France with his battalion in July 1915. Since September 16th, 1915 he had commanded his company, which up till then had been commanded by his brother-in-law. Captain Roland Hebeler, who was killed on that date. Capt Scott was also brother-in-law to Brigadier-General J.F. Riddell, killed in action in 1915. Although only 34, he had made his mark in his profession as a consulting mining engineer, and he was a director of' Bolsover & Blackwell Collieries, Derbyshire, and Newbiggin Colliery, Northumberland. Since 1912 he and his mother lived together at Down Place, Guildford.

Extract from The Scotsman - Tuesday 11 July 1916, page 6:

CAPT . GEORGE HENRY HALL SCOTT .

Cpt . George Henry Hall Scott, who has been killed in action, was the youngest son of the late Sir Henry Hall Scott, Hipsburn, Lesbury, Northumberland, and of Eilanreach, Invernessshire, and of Lady Scott, Down Place, Guildford . He was born in 1882, and educated at Aysgarth and Charterhouse. He received his commission in September 1914. Since September 16 he had commanded his company, succeeding his brother-in-law, Cpt Roland Hebeler, who was killed on that date. Cpt Scott was a consulting mining engineer, and was a director of Bolsover and Blackwell Collieries, Derbyshire, and Newbiggin Colliery, Northumberland.

Extract from Surrey Advertiser - Saturday 22 July 1916, page 5:

CAPT. SCOTT AND CAPT. HEBELER.

A memorial service was held in the Parish Church, Glenelg, Inverness-shire, on Sunday last, in memory of George Henry Hall Scott, Captain, ——— Service Batt. The Queen’s, who fell while leading his company on the 1st July, in the battle of the Somme, and of Roland Stuart Hebeler, Captain in the same battalion, his brother-in-law, who was killed September, 1915.

Extract from Surrey Advertiser - Monday 17 September 1917, page 1:

THE LAW COURTS.
A NORTHUMBERLAND GENTLEMAN'S WILL.

Mr. Justice Joyce was asked in the Chancery Division yesterday, to decide a question arising out of the will of the late Sir Henry Hall Scott, of Hipsburn, Northumberland. The plaintiffs were Dame Henrietta, the widow, and others, and the defendants were Adam Scott, George Henry Hall Scott, Janet May Hebeler, and Margaret Christobel Scott. The point was as to the true construction of the words in the will, "The whole of income," and whether the whole of the residue was divisible income among the testator's children, or whether part of it ought to be capitalised. Mr. Hughes, for the plaintiffs, stated that the residue amounted to a considerable sum, and chiefly consisted of stocks and shares in English mining companies.

Mr. Justice Joyce held that the children of the testator were entitled to receive the whole of the residue in equal shares.

Extract from Birmingham Daily Post - Wednesday 13 September 1916, page 7:

LATEST WILLS

Among latest wills proved are the following:—

Captain George Henry Hall Scott, of Down Place, Guildford, the 7th Battalion Queen's Royal West Surrey Regiment; a consulting mining engineer, and director of Bolsover and Blackwell Collieries, Derbyshire, and Newbiggin Colliery, Northumberland; killed in France active service (net personalty £66,516) ...............................

£73,626

SCOTT, MC

Maurice Douglas Guest

Captain Maurice Douglas Guest Scott
Captain Maurice Douglas Guest Scott
© Lives of the First World War
Captain (Pilot), 91 Training Squadron (Tangmere), Royal Flying Corps and 3rd Battalion, The Loyal North Lancashire Regiment. Died 17 March 1918 after being seriously injured when the Sopwith Pup he was flying, serial number C287, loop rolled and spun into ground 16 March 1918. Aged 22. Born 13 August 1895 in Mussoorie, Bengal Presidency, India. Son of Agnes Mary Guest Scott (born 20 February 1860), resident 72 Wilson St, Derby formerly 1, Rigby Road, Felixstowe. In 1910 he was a pupil at Bedford Grammar School, Bedford. Awarded the Military Cross (M.C.)[27 October 1917, Gazetted 18 March 1918]. Native of Derby. Buried in the East part of OCKBROOK (ALL SAINTS) CHURCHYARD, Derbyshire.

Citation for Military Medal:

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in aerial combats. On one occasion his patrol encountered seven enemy machines, two of which he drove down out of control. He has destroyed eleven enemy aeroplanes, and proved himself a very dashing patrol leader.

Extract from Derbyshire Advertiser and Journal - Friday 29 March 1918, page 7 and Saturday 30 March 1918, page 7 (note: the article is faded and some parts are almost illegible for both days):

DERBY OFFICER'S FATAL ACCIDENT.

Captain Maurice Douglas Guest Scott, M.C., of the Loyal North Lancs. Regiment, attached R.F.C., has been killed while flying in the South of England. He was the only surviving child of the late Mr. Philip Wm. Guest Scott, district engineer, E.I.R., India, and of Mrs Guest Scott, and a cousin of Mrs. J. Povey?-Harper, Wilson-street. Derby. The deceased officer, who was only 22 years of age, obtained his commission in 1914, shortly, after the outbreak of war, and was transferred to the Royal Flying Corps in 1916. In October last year he was awarded the Military Cross for services on the field in connection with aerial fighting and the bringing down enemy machines.

At the inquest held at Brighton on Wednesday it was stated that Capt. Scott was a most experienced pilot, and had gained the Military Cross in France. Before the war his home was at 72, Wilson-street, Derby. On Saturday afternoon he left the Tangmere Aerodrome, near Chichester, to visit some brother officers at Shoreham Aerodrome, Brighton. On leaving he went up some 900 feet and looped the loop. Then the machine got into a spin and it was thought Captain Scott misjudged the exact moment when he reached the safety ??? he failed to recover himself, and the machine crashed to the ground and was wrecked. Captain Scott was conveyed to a Military Hospital at Brighton, and died within a few hours, never recovering consciousness. He was badly injured, and died from shock. On returning a verdict of death from misadventure the jury expressed regret at the loss of such a valuable life, and sympathy with the relatives.

Extract from Derby Daily Telegraph - Thursday 21 March 1918, page 3:

ROLL THE HONOUR.
DERBY FLYING OFFICER KILLED.

An inquest was held at Brighton on Wednesday afternoon on Captain Douglas Guest Scott (22), of the Loyal North Lancs., attached Royal Flying Corps. Mr. Scott lived at 72, Wilson-street, Derby, and before the war was an engineer's apprentice. He had seen a great deal service with the R.F.C. in France, and had gained the Military Cross. Since his, return from the other side of the water he had been stationed at Tangmere Aerodrome, in the western part of the county of Sussex. On Saturday he flew over from Tangmere to visit some friends at Shoreham Aerodrome, some 20 miles distant. On leaving he ascended some 900 feet, and did the loop. On coming out of the loop he performed the stunt, and dropped into a spin. According' to a brother officer he came too close to the ground, and, being unable to recover himself, crashed to earth. The machine, was smashed, and Captain Scott died in hospital at Brighton, never having regained consciousness. Witnesses bore testimony to the fact that he was a most experienced pilot. The causo of death was direct shock. His injuries included a compound fracture of the left thigh, fracture of the right thigh, and severe laceration to the front of the scalp, The verdict was "Death by misadventure," and coroner and jury expressed deep sympathy with the relatives.

SCOTT-MILLER

Walter Dudley

Second Lieutenant (Pilot), 47 Training Squadron, Royal Flying Corps and Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment). Killed in a flying accident when flying a Farman (Maurice) S.11 Shorthorn, serial number A6892, out of Waddington 22 June 1917. Born 13 October 1898 in Brentford, Middlesex. Aged 19. Baptised 9 April 1899 in Eastwood, Essex, resident Belfair Chiswick. Son of Lt. Col. Walter Scott Miller, D.L., and Kate Scott Miller, of "Eastwood," Roehampton, London S.W.. Buried in PUTNEY VALE CEMETERY AND CREMATORIUM, London. Grave reference B. 211.

SCRIVEN

George Herbert

[Not located on CWGC or SDGW] Captain, 6th Battalion, Duke of Cambridge's Own (Middlesex Regiment). Died 12 December 1924 of meningitis brought on by the wound received in 1915. Aged 30. Born 14 November 1894. Only son of Charles Herbert and Ada Louisa Scriven. Joined the Rifle Corps in Oration Quarter 1908 and was promoted Lance Corporal on 3 May 1912. Baptised 9 December 1894 at Thorpe Episcopi, Norwich, Norfolk also at Thorpe St Andrew in 1894. In the 1901 census he was aged 6, born Thorpe St Andrew, Norfolk, son of Charles H and Ada L Scriven, resident Stewards House, Shorne, Strood, Kent. In the 1911 census he was aged 16, school boarder, born Thorpe, Suffolk (sic), resident Charterhouse, Godalming, Godalming Rural Detached, Surrey. Enlisted in the Middlesex Regiment in August 1914 and was sent to the Belgian Front. He was shot through the lung in September 1915. He was promoted Captain in 1916 and went to the front again in 1918. He was with the 11th Ghurkas in India from April 1919 until August 1920. On 23 November 1920, he was initiated into the Freemasonry as a member of Hazara Lodge in Abbottabad, India. On retirement from the army, he went into business in London.

Extract from England & Wales Government Probate Death Index 1925:

SCRIVEN George Herbert of Wallington Grange-road Lewes died 12 December 1924 at Royal Sussex County Hospital Brighton Administration Lewes 23 January to Charles Herbert Scriven gentleman. Effects £48 13s. 6d.

SEWELL

Francis Brooke

Second Lieutenant, 126th Heavey Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery. Killed in action 15 May 1918. Born 11 January 1899. Aged 19. Baptised 3 March 1899 at Dorking, St Martin, Surrey, resident Meadowbank, Surrey. Son of Ernest Brooke Sewell (a Stockbroker) and Margaret Eliza Sewell, of Meadowbank, Dorking, Surrey. In the 1901 census he was aged 2, born Dorking, Surrey, son of brooke and Margaret Sewell, resident Brookmead, Station Road, Dorking, Surrey. In the 1911 census he was aged 12, born Dorking, Surrey, a pupil at school, resident, Parkfield, Butlers Green, Haywards Heath, Sussex. At Charterhouse he regularly played cricket for the Swallows and Saunderites teams, being frequently singled out for outstanding play in Carthusian match reports. He was a member of the school Rifle Corps and was promoted Lance Corporal on 21st September 1914. Buried in HEDAUVILLE COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION, Somme, France. Row D. Grave 4.

Extract from West Sussex County Times - Saturday 25 May 1918, page 1:

SEWELL.—Killed in action, on the 15th inst., 2nd Lieut. Francis Brooke Sewell. R.G.A., only son of E. Brooke Sewell, of Meadowbank, Dorking, aged 19.

SHARP

Charles Gordon

Second Lieutenant, 4th Battalion (Territorial), Northumberland Fusiliers. Died of wounds 5 February 1916. Aged 30. Born 2 May 1885. Baptised 17 June 1885 in Bywell, St Andrew, Northumberland. Son of Robert and Mary Sharp, of Riding Mill, Northumberland. In the 1891 census he was aged 5, born Northumberland, a Scholar, son of Robert and Mary Sharp, resident Hollin Hill Terrace, Riding, Hexham, Northumberland. In the 1901 census he was aged 15, born Ridley Mill, Northumberland, a student boarder, resident Charterhouse Road, Godalming, Guildford, Surrey. Buried in VLAMERTINGHE MILITARY CEMETERY, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot I. Row G. Grave 15.

Extract from the Charterhouse Register, Cricket Quarter 1899:

Sharp, Charles Gordon. b. 2 May, 1885. (Robinites-Lockites); Left C.Q., 1901.-Engineering Pupil.
C. G. Sharp, Esq., Riding Mill, Northumberland

Extract from De Ruvigny's Roll of Honour 1914-1918, volume 4, page 181:

SHARP, CHARLES GORDON, 2nd lieut., 1/4th (Territorial) Battn. The Northumberland Fusiliers, yst. s. of the late Robert Sharp, Shipowner. by his wife, Mary, dau. of Edmund Ride; b. Riding Mill-on-Tyne, co. Northumberland, 2 May, 1885; educ. Aysgarth; Charterhouse, and Durham School of Science; subsequently settled at Katanga as a Mining Engineer; obtained a commission in the Northumberland Fusiliers; served with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders, and died 5 Feb. 1916, front wounds received in action in the Ypres salient. Buried at Vlamertinghe; unm.

Extract from England & Wales Government Probate Death Index 1916:

SHARP Charles Gordon of Kingmead Riding Mill Northumberland second lieutenant 4th battalion Northumberland Fusiliers died 5 February 1916 in Flanders Administration Newcastle-upon-Tyne 10 May to Mary Sharp widow.
Effects £3891 11s. 9d.

Extract from Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer - Tuesday 15 February 1916, page 8:

SEC.-LIEUT. CHARLES GORDON SHARP, 4th Northumberland Fusiliers (T.F.) has been officially announced to have died of wounds in France on February 5. The youngest son of the late Mr. R. Sharp, of Riding-Mill-on-Tyne he was educated at Charterhouse and Durham University, and was a mining engineer. At the commencement of the war he was doing survey and other work in the Belgian Congo. He joined the Anglo-Belgian Corps formed there, and in November, 1914, returned to England to train with the Inns of Court O.T.C.

Extract from Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer - Tuesday 15 February 1916, page 8, and Newcastle Journal - Thursday 10 February 1916, page 4, and Newcastle Journal - Saturday 12 February 1916, page 6:

SHARP.—Died of wounds in France, the 5th inst., aged 30 years, Second-Lieutenant Charles Gordon Sharp, 4th Northumberland Fusiliers, youngest son of Mary and the late Robert Sharp, of Riding Mill-on-Tyne.

SHAW

Philip Haldane

Second Lieutenant, 8th Battalion, Black Watch (Royal HIghlanders). Killed in action 25 September 1915. Aged 23. Son of Henry and Emily Shaw, of Black Birches, Hadhall, Shrewsbury, Salop. In the 1901 census he was aged 8, born Eddleston, Peebleshire, Scotland, son of Henry and Emily Shaw, resident with his grandparents, James and Emily Haldrine [sic], at Grosvenor Crescent, 1, Edinburgh, St George, Midlothian, Scotland. Educated Charterhouse and University College, Oxford University. In the 1911 census he was aged 18, born Eddleston, Peebleshire, a school boarder, resident Charterhouse, Godalming, Surrey. Matriculated 1911 at University College, Oxford University; Member of University O.T.C. prior to 1915. Enlisted 15 August 1914. No known grave. Commemorated on LOOS MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France. Panel 78 to 83.

Extract from Dundee Evening Telegraph - Friday 8 October 1915, page 4:

Mr P. H. Shaw, 8th Black Watch.

Second-Lieutenant Philip Haldane Shaw, 8th Battalion the Black Watch (killed in action in France September 25), was 'the second son of Mr and Mrs H. D. Shaw, Black Birches, near Shrewsbury, and was aged 23. He obtained his commission in August last year.

SHAW

Randolph Albert

Major, "A" Battery, 62nd Brigade, Royal Field Artillery. Died of wounds 14 November 1916. Aged 35. Born 9 February 1881. Baptised 27 February 1881 in Mozufferpore, Bengal. Son of Mr. and Mrs. Ferdinand Albert Shaw; husband of Ursula F. Shaw, of Wynford, Milford-on-Sea, Lymington, Hampshire. Educated at Bedford Kindergarten School, Bedford (1886, guardian Mrs Urquhart) and Charterhouse. In the 1891 census he was aged 10, born India, a pupil boarder, resident Spital Street, Stoke, Guildford, Surrey (now the site of Guildford College). In the 1911 census he was aged 30, born Behar, Bengal, India, married, serving with the Army, a Captain, 67th Battery Royal Field Artillery, billeted at Neemuch, Rajputana, India. Buried in DARTMOOR CEMETERY, BECORDEL-BECOURT, Somme, France. Plot II. Row B. Grave 14. Also commemorated on a wall mounted plaque in the Union Jack Club, Sandell Street, Lambeth, Greater London.

Extract from the Charterhouse Register, Oration Quarter 1894:

Shaw, Randolph Albert. b. 9 Feb., 1881. (Robinites-Girdlestoneites); Left C.Q., 1897.-Joined R. A., 1900; served in S. African War with 29th Batt. I.Y., 1902.
R. A. Shaw, Esq., Hale Place, East Peckham, Tunbridge.

Extract from England & Wales Government Probate Death Index 1917:

SHAW Randolph Albert of Milford-on-Sea Hampshire major R.F.A. died 14 November 1916 in France Probate London 28 March to Ursula Frances Shaw widow. Effects £1091.

Extract from Dundee Evening Telegraph - Friday 8 October 1915, page 4:

Major Randolph Albert Shaw, R.F.A., who died of wounds received on November 14, aged 35, was educated at Charterhouse, and obtained his commission in 1901. He served with the Yeomanry in the South African War. He was the eldest son of the late F. A. Shaw and Mrs. Shaw, of Harlington, Milford-on-Sea. He married. in 1909, Ursula. daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Agar, and leaves a widow and two daughters.

Extract from Newcastle Journal - Saturday 02 December 1916, page 4:

Major Randolph Albert Shaw, Royal Field Artllerv (died of wounds), was born in February, 1881, and passed out of Woolwich into the Royal Artillery in January, 1900. He had promotion in 1901, and for twelve months from February, 1902, was attached to the Imperial Yeomanry. In August, 1908, he had his captaincy in the Artillery, and in October, 1914, he received his majority. He was appointed Adjutant of the Territorial Force in February, 1912. Fo- his services in the Boer War in 1902 Major Shaw was decorated with the Queen's Medal with two clasps.

SHAW

Stuart Stoke

[Not located on CWGC or SDGW] Private 265860, 7th Battalion, The King's Liverpool Regiment. Died of war injuries at West Stoke, Chichester, Sussex 14 December 1921. Born 27 November 1883. Baptised 6 January 1884 in West Stoke, Sussex. Enlisted 27 October 1914. Third son of Reverend William Frederick Shaw. In the 1891 census he was aged 7, born West Stoke, Sussex, son of William F and Emily Shaw, resident The Rectory, Village, West Stoke, Westhampnett, Sussex. In the 1901 census he was aged 17, born Stoke, Sussex, a school boarder, resident Charterhouse Block, Godalming Rural, Guildford, Surrey. He became an engineer. Married Mary Theresa Sweeney, at Blackburn in November to December Quarter 1909. His son, Geoffrey Bernard Shaw, was born in March 1911. They lived at Dellham, Raven Meols Lane, Formby and Stuart and was listed in the 1912-1915 Electoral Registers as living there. By the time of the 1911 census, he was aged 27, born West Stoke, Sussex, retired from engineering, married to Mary Shaw, resident Dellham, Raven Moels Lane, Formby, Lancashire. Served overseas from December 1915. Wounded three times and on the third occasion was taken prisoner in 1918. Discharged as no longer physically fit for military service, under King's Regulations paragraph 392 (xvi) A, 26 April 1919, aged 35, awarded Silver Badge B239222 on 23 July 1919. Buried in ST. LUKE CHURCHYARD, FORMBY, Metropolitan Borough of Sefton, Merseyside. Section 1. Also commemorated on Holy Trinity War Memorial, Formby, Merseyside and on the Formby Cross, Merseyside.

Extract from England & Wales Government Probate Death Index 1922:

SHAW Stuart Stoke of 49 Raven Meols-lane Formby Lancashire engineer died 14 December 1921 Probate Liverpool 23 January to the reverend William Arnold Shaw clerk and Edward Cooper White bank manager.
Effects £841 15s. 2d.

Extract from Formby Times - Saturday 17 December 1921, page 2:

FORMBY DEATHS.
Mr. S. S. Shaw.

Much sympathy is felt with the family of Mr. Stuart Stoke Shaw, who passed away at his home in Raven Meols-lane on Wednesday. at the age of thirty-eight. Mr. Shaw (who was the third son of the Rev. Prebendary W. F. Shaw. of Chichester) came to Formby in 1910 from South Shields. He joined the Army early in 1914, serving in the 7th King's (Liverpool) Regiment. He was two years and nine months in France. where he was three times wounded, and finally taken prisoner, being sent in the Munster Prison Camp in Gennary. While there he contracted tuberculosis, from which he was suffering when he returned home. He was confined to bed for eight months before the end came. He leaves a widow and three children to mourn their loss. Mr. Shaw was well known and greatly respeccted in the district. He was one of the founders of the Formby Ex-Service Men's Association, of which he was the first vice-president. He belonged to the Formby and Freshfield Bowling Clubs, and was at one time a meanber of the club connected with Holy Trinity Church, where be was a worshipper. The funeral will take place at St. Luke's on Saturday. at 2.30 p.m. Members of the Ex-Service Men's Associatiom are asked to assemble at the house in Raven Meols-lane at 1.45 pm.

SHEPPARD, MiD

Charles Westcar

Lieutenant, Royal Engineers. Died in 29 October 1918. Aged 36. Son of William John Sheppard, M.D., and Ellen Mary Sheppard, of 235, Upper Richmond Rd., Putney. Served in Salonika (Greece). Mentioned in Despatches (MiD). In the 1891 census he was aged 9, born Wandsworth, Surrey, son of William J and Ellen M Sheppard, resident High Street, Putney, Wandsworth, London & Surrey. In the 1901 census he was aged 19, born Wandsworth, Surrey, son of William J and Ellen M Sheppard, resident 211, Upper Richmond Road, Putney, Wandsworth, London & Surrey. Buried in PUTNEY VALE CEMETERY AND CREMATORIUM, London. Grave reference: D.4. 129.

Extract from the Charterhouse Register, Oration Quarter 1895:

Sheppard, Charles Westcar. b. 11 Feb., 1882. (Gownboys); Left O.Q., 1896. Went to Westminster School.-Engineer.
C. W. Sheppard, Esq., 211; Upper Richmond Road, Putney, S.W.

SHORTT

William Edward Dudley

Also known as Dudley SHORTT. Lieutenant, 1st Battalion, Scots Guards. Killed in action 12 October 1917. Born 25 October 1892 in London. Baptised 17 December 1892 in Chelsea, Middlesex. Son of Edward Shortt, Esq., K.C.M.P. and Isabella Stewart Shortt, of 70, Onslow Gardens, London S.W. Religious denomination Church of England. Educated Elstree and Charterhouse. Formerly Second Lieutenant, 1st/5th (Territorial) Battalion, East Surrey Regiment, joined Scots Guards 4 December 1915, rank confirmed 5 June 1916. Embarked Southampton 1 April 1916, posted to 1st Battalion 8 April 1916, served in Cawnpore and Nowshera, joined battalion 13 April 1916, confirmed 2nd Lieutenant 5 June 1916, promoted Lieutenant 19 July 1916 [London Gazette Supplement 27 April 1917]. Suffered shot wounds to left elbow 26 November 1916, attended 2 Red Cross Hospital 16 December 1916, rejoined battalion 19 December 1916. Buried in BLEUET FARM CEMETERY, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot I. Row A. Grave 22.

Extract from England & Wales Government Probate Death Index 1918:

SHORTT William Edward Dudley of 70 Onslow-gardens Middlesex died 12 October 1917 in France Administration London 10 December to Edward Shortt K.C. M.P.
Effects £218. 2s. 10d.

Extract from Shields Daily News - Friday 19 October 1917, page 4:

SECOND-LIEUT. DUDLEY SHORTT WOUNDED.

Second-Lieut. Dudley Shortt, Scots Guards, only son of Mr Edward Shortt, M.P. for Newcastle, has been wounded by shrapnel, but has been able to return duty.

Extract from Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer - Friday 19 October 1917, page 6:

SEC.-LIEUT. DUDLEY SHORTT, Scots Guards, killed action, was the only son of Mr. Edward Shortt, senior M.P. for Newcastle. Lieut. Shortt was educated at Charterhouse, and was subsequently with Messrs. Furness, Withy, and Co. He enlisted on the outbreak of war, and served in the ranks in India, being subsequently gazetted to the Scots Guards. He had been wounded previously.

Extract from Dundee Evening Telegraph - Friday 19 October 1917, page 1, and Berks and Oxon Advertiser - Friday 26 October 1917, page 6, and Berks and Oxon Advertiser - Friday 9 November 1917, page 8, and Birmingham Daily Gazette - Friday 19 October 1917, page 3, and The Tewkesbury Register, and Agricultural Gazette - Saturday 27 October 1917, page 7:

Second-Lieut. Dudley Shortt, Scots Guards, killed in action was the only son of Mr E. Shortt, K.C., M.P. for Newcastle.

Extract from Shields Daily News - Friday 19 October 1917, page 4:

SON OF MR EDWARD SHORTT, M.P., KILLED.

Lieut. W. E. Dudley Shortt, Scots Guards, killed in action October 12th, was the only son of Mr Edward Shortt, K.C., M.P., senior member for Newcastle, and Mrs Edward Shortt, of 70 Onslow Gardens, S.W. He was educated at the South School, at Elstree, and at Charterhouse, where was in the cricket eleven. He passed into Sandhurst, but was rejected on ground of his eyesight and in 1914, he was with Messrs Furness, Withy and Co.. Ltd. Immediately the war broke out he enlisted in the East Regiment, with which he served as a private until December, 1915, when he received his commission in the Scots Guards. His colonel wrote: “Dudley was loved by everyone in the battalion, officers and men, and he indeed can ill be spared. He was absolutely fearless and a splendid officer.” For some months he had been acting adjutant of his battalion.

SIDEBOTHAM

James Nasmyth Wegwood

[Lieutenant in newspaper article] Captain, 17th Battalion, Manchester Regiment. Killed in action 12 October 1916. Aged 25. Fourth son of James Nasmyth Sidebotham; brother of Mr. Francis Nasmyth Sidebotham, of Raleigh House, Ottery St. Mary, Devon. Educated at Charterhouse, awarded the Nat Science Prize in 1906, the Eustace Dallin Wade for Biology in 1907, and again for Physics in 1908; went up to Clare College, Cambridge. M.A. In the 1901 censsu he was aged 9, born Altrincham, Cheshire, son of James N Sidebotham (a widower), resident Groby Lawn, Groby Road, Altrincham, Bucklow, Cheshire. No known grave. Commemorated on THIEPVAL MEMORIAL, Somme, France. Pier and Face 13 A and 14 C.

Extract from England & Wales Government Probate Death Index 1917:

SIDEBOTHAM James Nasmyth Wedgwood of Egloshayle Vicarage Wadebridge Cornwall temporary captain 17th Manchester regiment died 12 October 1916 in France Probate London 22 February to Francis Nasmyth Sidebotham lieutenant Royal Army Medical Corps. Effects £16787 11s. 9d.

Extract from Manchester Evening News - Thursday 19 October 1916, page 3:

KILLED.

Lieut. JAMES NASMYTH WEDGWOOD SIDEBOTHAM, Manchester Regiment, elder son the late Mr. James Sidebotham, Groby Road, Altrincham, who was educated at Charterhouse and Clare College, Cambridge, where he took the B.A. degree. He was given a commission in the Manchesters in October, 1914, and went to the front last November. Lieut. Sidebotham, who 25 years of age, was nephew of Mr. J. W. Sidebotham and Dr. E. J. Sidebotham, of Bowdon.

SILLEM

Augustus Charles Herman

Second Lieutenant, "A" Battery, 52nd brigade, Royal Field Artillery. Killed in action at Delville Wood 18 July 1916. Aged 27. Son of Herman and Lucy Sillem. Matriculated 1906 at Oriel College, Oxford University/ No known grave. Commemorated on THIEPVAL MEMORIAL, Somme, France. Pier and Face 1 A and 8 A. Also commemorated on St Margaret's Church War Memorial, Cantley, Norfolk and also Branksome School Old Boys War Memorial, Godalming Surrey.

Extract from Surrey Advertiser - Saturday 5 August 1916, page 5:

Sec.-Lt. Augustus Charles Herman Sillem, Royal Field Artillery, was the eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. W. Sillcm, The Pines, Horsell, aged 23. He was educated at Charterhouse and Oriel College, Oxford, and in 1910 went to Chile, where remained until shortly after the outbreak of war. Returning home, he obtained a commission as temporary second-lieutenant the R.F.A. in February, 1915. and went to France early in the following July, having therefore beenat the front just over year when killed in action the 18th ult.

SILLEM, MC

Thomas George

Captain, 16th Battalion, Welsh Regiment. Killed in action 14 April 1918. Aged 22. Son of George and Ada Fanny Sillem, of "Three Ways," Harvey Lane, Thorpe, Norwich. Educated Holt School, Norfolk and Charterhouse. Awarded the Military Cross (M.C.). In the 1901 census he was aged 5, born London, Middlesex, son of George and Ada F Sillem, resident The Street, Stratton St Mary, Depwade, Norfolk. No known grave. Commemorated on TYNE COT MEMORIAL, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 93 to 94. See also Long Stratton, Norfolk

Extract from Diss Express - Friday 26 April 1918, page 5:

The death has been officially announced of Lieut. Thomas George Sillem, who was killed in action on the 14th April. Lieut. Sillem would have been 23 next month. He was the only son of Mr. George Sillem, late of Long Stratton. He enlisted in the Suffolk Yeomanry in the week war was declared, ... (illegible) ... a motor cyclist despatch rider fora year before he got his commission in a Welsh regiment. He was wounded in October, 1916. He won his M.C. last September.

SIMPSON

Cyril Woodhouse

Lieutenant, 7th Battalion, Leicestershire Regiment. Killed in action 14 July 1916. Aged 24. Baptised 5 March 1892 in Leicester, St John the Baptist, Leicestershire. Son of John Woodhouse and Ada Simpson, of 148, New Walk, Leicester. In the 18901 census he was aged 9, born Leicestershire, son of John W. (an Architect and Surveyor) and Ada Simpson, resident 18, Alexandra Road, Leicester, Leicestershire. In the 1911 census he was aged 19, born Leicester, Leicestershire, unmarried, an Assistant Master at preparatory school in London Road, Leicester, Leicestershire. No known grave. Commemorated on THIEPVAL MEMORIAL, Somme, France. Pier and Face 2 C and 3 A. Also commemorated on St. Mary Magdalene Church War Memorial, Knighton, Leicestershire.

Extract from England & Wales Government Probate Death Index 1917:

SIMPSON Cyril Woodhouse of "Hillside" Guildford-road Leicester second lieutenant 7th battalion Leicestershire regiment died 14 July 1916 in France killed in action Administration Leicester 16 December to John Woodhouse Simpson architect. Effects £382 16s.

Extract from Leicester Chronicle - Saturday 29 July 1916, page 7:

LIEUT. J. (sic) W. SIMPSON.

Mr. John Woodhouse Simpson, of Hillside, Guildford-road, Leicester, has received intimation that his son, Second-Lieut. Cyril Woodhouse Simpson, Leicestershire Regt., was killed in action on July 14. He was 24 years of age. Educated at Rudd's School, Leicester, and Charterhousse, he went to Oriel College, Oxford. He was a succesful coxswain in the Oriel eight, and was a cox for the Varsity eight during practices for the 1914 boat race, but, to the disappointment of his friends, was superseded, about a week before the event, by the former cox.

SKEFFINGTON

Herbert Neville Southwell

Second Lieutenant (Pilot), 57th Squadron, Royal Flying Corps formerly Royal Australian Engineers. Missing presumed killed in action flying a De Havilland D.H.4, serial number A7448, when he failed to return from a bombing raid on Inglemunster, 28 July 1917; his Observer, Lt A C Malloch, was taken Prisoner of War; news of his death and the capture of Lt Malloch were received in a German message. Aged 33. Born 25 June 1884. Son of Martin Southwell Skeffington, of 6, Leinster Mansions, Hampstead, London, and the late Mary Louisa Skeffington. His father was an Assistant Master at Charterhouse. In the 1891 census he was aged 6, born London, Middlesex, a scholar, son of Mary L Skeffington, resident Clifton Road, Folkestone, Elham, Kent,. In the 1901 census he was aged 16, born Notting Hill, Middlesex, a London stock exchange jobbers clerk, boarding at 9, Ledbury Road, Kensington, London & Middlesex. Originally joined the Australian Imperial Force and was subsequently transferred to R.F.C. Originally a Photographer,he had been associated for some years with the publishing firm of Skeffington & Son and afterwards spent some time in British Columbia. He was in Brisbane, Australia, when the war broke out and enlisted as a Sapper, 3rd Field Company, Australian Engineers and embarked at Melbourne, Victoria, on transport A2, "Geelong", 22 September 1914. Religious denomination Church of England. Next of kin his father, Martin Skeffington, 34, Southampton Street, Strand, London. Served with the Australian Forces in Egypt, Gallipoli and France, where he received his commission. He volunteered for the Royal Flying Corps and, after training, was sent to the front on 14 July 1917. He was listed as a passenger, aged 28, sailing from Liverpool aboard the "Campania" to the United States 8 February 1913. He was later listed as sailing from London to Brisbane, Queensland, Australia, aboard "Orontes" on 18 June 1914. Buried on North side of Church in WIELSBEKE COMMUNAL CEMETERY, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Grave No. 3.

Extract from the Charterhouse Register, Oration Quarter 1897:

Skeffington, Herbert Neville Southwell. b. 25 June, 1884. (Gownboys); Left O.Q., 1899.-In firm of Messrs. Skeffington & Sons (Publishers).
H. N. S. Skeffington, Esq., 43, Compayne Gardens, Hampstead, N. W.

SKINNER

Douglas Hilton

Captain, "A" Company, 7th Battalion, Queen's Own (Royal West Kent Regiment). Died of wounds 16 July 1916. Aged 24. Elder son of Hilton and Emily Catharine Skinner, of Ash Lodge, Hayes, Kent. Medical Student, B.A. Oxford and Charterhouse Officers' Training Corps. Matriculated 1911, University College, Oxford University. In the 1911 census he was aged 18, born Beckenham, Kent, a school boarder, resident Charterhouse, Godalming, Surrey. Previously admitted to Queen Alexandra's Military Hospital at Millbank 30 August 1915 with eczema and transferred to the Royal Free 23 September 1915. Buried in DAOURS COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION, Somme, France. Plot I. Row B. Grave 12. Also commemorated on Hayes Memorial, London.

Extract from De Ruvigny's Roll of Honour 1914-1918, volume 2, page 276:

SKINNER, DOUGLAS HILTON, Capt., 7th (Service) Battn. The Queen's Own (Royal West Kent Regt.), elder s. of Hilton Skinner, of Ash Lodge, Hayes, co. Kent, by his wife, Emily Catharine, 2nd dau. of the late Thomas Thomson, of Chalfont Eden Park, Solicitor, and a descendant of the late Dr. Robert Skinner, Bishop of Oxford in 1641; b. Beckenham, co. Kent, 20 June, 1892; educ. St. Andrew's, Eastbourne; Charterhouse, where he was head of Weekites, and a Cadet Lieut. in the O.T.C., and University College, Oxford, where he graduated B.A. in May, 1916; studied medicine and was in his fourth year, with a view to entering the R.A.M.C., but applied for a commission on the outbreak of war in Aug. 1914, and in the meantime enlisted in the Royal Fusiliers; was gazetted 2nd Lieut. West Kent Regt. 1 Sept.; promoted Lieut. 1 Feb. 1915, and Capt. 29 Dec. following; trained at Pur-fleet, and on Salisbury Plain; served with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders from July, 1915, where for a time he was Acting Adjutant, and died in No. 45 Casualty Clearing Station 16 July, 1916, from wounds received in action at Trônes Wood, during the Battle of the Somme. on the 13th. The Battalion Major wrote : "I can honestly say there was no more competent officer in the battalion, nor one who was better liked; under any circumstances he was always in the best of spirits and was a great pal with us all. He did his fair share in a magnificent performance. . . . I am sure you will be glad to know he was doing extraordinarily good work, and at the time was commanding a company; you may well be proud of him," and a brother officer: "I have never met anyone who did such good work with such a little to say about it. He did fine work the night he was wounded, and was most gallant when wounded." Unm.

Extract from England & Wales Government Probate Death Index 1916:

SKINNER Douglas Hilton of Ash Lodge Hayes' Common Kent lieutenant His Majesty's Queen's Own West Kent regiment died 16 July 1916 in France on active service Administration London 13 September to Hilton Skinner esquire.
Effects £382 75. 3d.

SLINGSBY, MC

Henry Laurence

Captain Henry Laurence Slingsby
Captain Henry Laurence Slingsby
© Lives of the First World War
Captain Henry Laurence Slingsby
Captain Henry Laurence Slingsby
© IWM (HU 126541)
Captain, 2nd Battalion, King's Own (Yorkshire Light Infantry) attached to (Adjutant), 10th Battalion, Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry. Died of wounds 11 August 1917. Aged 24. Born 19 April 1893 in Carleton in Craven. Son of William Cecil and Alison Slingsby, of St. Anthonys, Heversham, Westmorland. Went to France 14 August 1914. Awarded the Military Cross (M.C.). In the El;ectoral Register 1915 he is registered at Whitbarrow Lodge, Grange-over-Sands, Crosthwaite, Westmorland. Buried in ADINKERKE MILITARY CEMETERY, West Vlaanderen, Belgium. Row G. Grave 4. Also commemorated on Beetham Village Memorial , Cumbria.

Extract from England & Wales Government Probate Death Index 1917:

SLINGSBY Henry Laurence of Beetham House Milnthorpe Westmorland died 11 August 1917 in Belgium Administration London 27 October to William Cecil Slingsby esquire. Effects £310 8s. 7d.

Extract from Lancashire Evening Post - Monday 27 August 1917, page 5:

GALLANT OFFICER.
TRIBUTES TO LATE LIEUT. SLINGBBY, MILNTHORPE.

Lieutenant and Adjutant Henry Laurence Slingsby, M.C., K.O. Yorks L.I., attached Duke of Cornwall’s L.I., who died of wounds on August 11th, aged 24, was the younger son of Mr. and Mrs. William Cecil Slingsby, of Beetham House, Milnthorpe, Westmorland. He was educated at Eastman’s, Southsea, and Charterhouse, and received a commission in the Special Reserve in February, 1913. He went to the front early in August, 1914, and was all through the first six months* of the fighting, receiving his Regular commission in October, 1914, and being mentioned in one of Lord French’s early despatches. He was badly wounded in February, 1915, and promoted lieutenant about the same time.

His captain (soon after killed) wrote:—“He was my right-hand in the company. . . . I cannot speak too highly of your boy's work. . . . His experience in the war was invaluable to us all and I had to rely on him to a great extent. Besides doing his duty steadily and regularly at all times, he was always active and resourceful in devising means of worrying the enemy, and kept the men up to the mark by his bearing and example under fire and gained their admiration and respect. . . . On many occasions he has displayed great gallantry. . . . He took good care of his men and was very popular with them.”

In May, 1916. Lieutenant Slingsby was appointed adjutant to a Service battalion of the Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry. He was lately awarded the Military Cross.

Extract from Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer - Thursday 16 August 1917, page 7:

LIEUT. HENRY LAURENCE SLINGSBY MC., K.O.Y.L.I, attached Duke of Cornwall's L.I., is announced have died of wounds August 11. Aged 24 years, he was the younger son Mr. and Mrs. William Cecil Slingsby.

SLOPER, MC, MiD

Gerald Orby

Captain, Northumberland Fusiliers. Died on service 8 February 1919. Aged 33. Born 16 October 1885 in Lower Slaughter, Gloucestershire. Son of Marion Sloper, of 16A, Seymour Place, West Brompton, London, and the late Gerard Orby Sloper (of Westrop House, Highworth, Wiltshire. Awarded the Military Cross (M.C.), Twice Mentioned in Despatches (MiD). In the 1891 census he was aged 5, born Lower Slaughter, Gloucestershire, son of Gerard O and Marion Sloper, resident Westrop House, Cricklade Road, Highworth, Wiltshire. In the 1901 census he was aged 15, born Lower Slaughter, Gloucestershire, a school boarder, residen t Charterhouse Block, Godalming Rural, Guildford, Surrey. Height 5 feet 10 inches. Spoke French. Served in Suth Africa from 1 April 1905 to 4 March 1907. Taken prisoner of War 15 June 1915. Buried in MURMANSK NEW BRITISH CEMETERY, Russian Federation (North). Row B. Grave 12.

Extract from England & Wales Government Probate Death Index 1919:

SLOPER Gerard Orby of Highworth Wiltshire died 8 February 1919 at Murmansk North Russia Administration London 17 June to Gerard Orby Sloper esquire.
Effects £961 14s. 7d.

SMITH

Alfred Archibald

Lieut. Alfred Archibald SmithLieutenant, 1st/5th Battalion (Territorial), South Staffordshire Regiment. Killed in action 2 April 1916. Born 17 October 1889. Aged 26. Baptised 19 November 1889 in Walsall, St John, Staffordshire. Son of Thomas Alfred and Sophy Smith, of 64, Highgate Rd., Walsall, Staffs. Educated at Yarlet Hall, Stafford, before coming to Charterhouse as a Scholar (Head Boy); Head Monitor of Bodeites; 1908 he was runner up in Elwyn prize for encouragement of Modern History; member of both the Fives and Debating committees. Graduated at University College, London. In the 1891 census he was aged 1, born Walsall, Staffordshire, son of Thomas Alfred and Sophy Smith, resident Wednesbury Road, Walsall Foreign, Walsall, Staffordshire. In the 1911 census he was aged 21, born Walsall, Staffordshire, assisting his father in a Brass and Iron Foundry business, son of Thomas Alfred and Sophy Smith, resident 64 Highgate Road, Walsall, Staffordshire. On 20 December 1911 he was initiated into the Freemasonry as a member of the Charterhouse Deo Dante Dedi Lodge. Buried in ECOIVRES MILITARY CEMETERY, MONT-ST. ELOI, Pas de Calais, France. Plot I. Row B. Grave 1.

Extract from England & Wales Government Probate Death Index 1916:

SMITH Alfred Archibald of Westmount Highgate-road Walsall Staffordshire lieutenant 5th battalion South Staffordshire regiment died 2 April 1916 at Ecoivres in France on active service Administration London 20 June to Thomas
Alfred Smith ironfounder. Effects £1782 2s. 11d.

Extract from Walsall Observer - Saturday 8 April 1916, page 7:

LOCAL OFFICER KILLED IN ACTION.
Lieut. A. A. Smith Falls While Leading His Men.
HEAD BOY AT CHARTERHOUSE

Much sympathy will be felt with Mr. and Mrs T. A. Smith, of “Westmount,” Highgate, in the loss of their elder son, Lieutenant Alfred Archibald Smith, who has given his life while leading his men into action this week. The sad news was first conveyed to the bereaved family Wednesday, and later a letter was received from Major W. Winstance explaining the circumstances. It appears that the enemy exploded two mines under one of our front line trenches, throwing a terrible amount of earth into the air and breaking the communication between two companies. The company of which Lieutenant Smith was in charge was moved up in support, and was trying to get in touch across the open ground, when they were met by a fierce machine-gun fire, which enfiladed the gap. Lieutenant Smith is stated to have met his death instantaneously. In all, there were about 30 casualties, including four officers. Lieutenant Wilkinson, Lieutenant Shortman, and two other local officers, are stated to have been wounded. The deceased officer, who was 26 years of age and unmarried, was educated at Charterhouse, where he showed such ability, that he obtained a much-coveted scholarship and rose to the positon of head boy. Later, he graduated at University College, London. Subsequently he became associated with his father in the business of Messrs. A. S. Smith & Sons, of Charles Street, and about six years ago obtained a commission in the local Territorials, in which be had taken active interest ever since. When war broke out he was among the first to volunteer for foreign service, and after a period in Walsall training the Non-Manual Corps, went out to France, over a year ago. In the following May he was invalided home with measles, and on recovering was attached to a reserve battalion of the Staffordshire Regiment. Last autumn Lieutenant Smith again received orders for France, and was on active service throughout the winter. The deceased officer was very popular with his men, and on many occasions proved himself a brave and able leader.

The only remaining son of Mr. T. A. Smith—Lieutenant T. S. Smith, who was invalided from France some time ago—is now staying as a convalescent on the Mendip Hills. He is a very clever marksman, and in 1914 he achieved remarkable success at Bisley, finishing fifth m the competition for the King s prize.

Extract from Staffordshire Advertiser - Saturday 15 April 1916, page 5:

ROLL OF HONOUR.

Mr. T. A. Hmith, J.P., of Walsall, has received news that his elder son. Lieut. Alfred Archibald Smith, South Staffordshire Regiment, was killed in action last week. Lieut. Smith was well known in the town, and much sympathy is felt with the bereaved parents. Twenty-six years of age, the deceased officer was educated at Charterhouse, where he obtained important scholarship and rose to the position of head boy. Later, he graduated at University College, London. Subsequently, he joined his father in the business, Messrs. A. S. Smith and Sons, and about six years ago took a commission in the local Territorials. When war broke out he immediately volunteered for foreign service. He was extremely popular with his men. It reported that Lieut. Smith was struck on the head with a bullet and killed instantly.

Extracts from Staffordshire Advertiser - Saturday 6 April 1929, page 11, and Walsall Observer - Saturday 30 March 1929, page 7:

THE INSCRIPTIONS.

The inscriptions on the bells are as follows:—

9th. Thomas Rudhall Glocester, Founder, 1775. Recast 1928 in Memory of Lieutenant Alfred Archibald Smith, who fell in action at Arras, April 2nd, 1916. Aged 26.

SMITH, MC

Herbert George

[Not listed on SDGW] Captain, Royal Army Service Corps. Died 16 February 1919. Aged 46. Born 27 July 1872. Son of Elisha and Annie Smith, of Liverpool. Awarded the Military Cross (M.C.). In the 1891 census he was aged 18, born Liverpool, an Oxford undergraduate, son of Elisha Smith (a wdiower), resident Alexandra Drive, Toxteth Park, Lancashire. In the 1901 census he was aged 28, born Liverpool, Lancashire, a Barrister, unmarried, resident 60, Grosvenor Street, London, St George Hanover Square, London & Middlesex. Buried in BROOKWOOD CEMETERY, Surrey. Plot 56. No. 181272.

Extract from the Charterhouse Register, Long Quarter 1887:

Smith, Herbert George. b. 27 July, 1872. (Weekites); Junior & Senior Scholar; Left C.Q., 1890. Univ. Coll., Oxf.; M.A.- Barrister, 1900; Lincoln's Inn.
H. G. Smith, Esq., 60, Grosvenor Street, W.

Extract from England & Wales Government Probate Death Index 1919:

SMITH Herbert George of 20 Chester-square Middlesex died 16 February 1919 Administration London 17 April to Leonard Eaton Smith esquire. Effects £11634 13s. 3d. Resworn £12727 0s. 4d. and £12812 25. 11d.

SMITH

Leslie Tidlen

[Listed as Leslie Tildero SMITH on SDGW, Listed as Leslie Tilders SMITH on Probate Index] Second Lieutenant, 7th Battalion, King's Own (Yorkshire Light Infantry). Killed in action 16 September 1916. Aged 19. Son of Sydney Alfred and Florence M. Smith, of Howard House, Maidstone. No known grave. Commemorated on THIEPVAL MEMORIAL, Somme, France. Pier and Face 11 C and 12 A.

Extract from England & Wales Government Probate Death Index 1916:

SMITH Leslie Tilders of Howard House Maidstone died 16 September 1916 in France on active service Administration London 28 October to Sydney Alfred Smith brewer.
Effects £118 12s. 8d.

Extract from Civil & Military Gazette (Lahore) - Saturday 28 October 1916, page 11:

Yorks. L. I.—Temp. Sec.-Lieut Leslie Tilden Smith from a Serv. Bn., to be sec.-lieut. and to retain his seniority in his present unit until odered to join Regular unit. 26th Sept., with seniority as from 9th Aug.

SMITH

Lothrop Lewis de Bernière

Lieutenant LOTHROP LEWIS DE BERNIERE SMITH, Rifle BrigadeLieutenant, 6th Battalion, Rifle Brigade (The Prince Consort's Own). Died on service 3 September 1916. Aged 23. Son of Johnson Mallett De Berniere Smith, of New Orleans, Louisiana, U.S.A. and Margaret Zoe Smith (nee Ford), of Brooklyn, New York, U.S.A. In the 1901 census he was aged 7, born St Pancras, Middlesex, son of Johnson M De B Smith, resident 4, Gloucester Terrace, St Pancras, London & Middlesex. Matriculated 1913 at Magdalen College, Oxford University. Buried in LEYSDOWN (ST. CLEMENT) CHURCHYARD, Kent.

Extract from England & Wales Government Probate Death Index 1916:

DE BERNIERE SMITH Lothrop Lewis of 4 Gloucester-gate Regents Park Middlesex second lieutenant RifIe Brigade died 3 September 1916 at Wellmarsh Military Hospital Sheerness Kent on active service Administration London 1 November to Johnson Mallett de Berniere Smith merchant. Effects £246 18s 9d.

Extract from London and China Express - Wednesday 13 September 1916, page 8:

Smith.—On Sunday, the 3rd Sept., 1916, at Wellmarsh Military Hospital, Sheerness, the result of a motor accident the previous day, Lieut. Lothrop Lewis de Berniere Smith, Rifle Brigade, third son of Mr. and Mrs. J. de Berniere Smith, 4, Gloucester-gate, Regent's-park, aged 23.

Extract from London and China Express - Wednesday 13 September 1916, page 9:

Lieutenant LOTHROP LEWIS DE BERNIERE SMITH, Rifle Brigade, whose death in hospital at Sheerness, from injuries received in a motor cycle accident we gave in our last issue, was the third son of Mr. and Mrs. J. de Berniere Smith, 4, Gloucester-gatel, Regent 's Park. Born in St. Katharine's Precinct, Regent's Park, Aug. 24, 1893, he was educated at Scaitcliffe School, Charterhouse (Girdlestones) and Magdalen College, Oxford, and was a member of the O.T.C. at the two latter places. He got his commission Aug. 15, 1914. and was severely wounded at Ypres in May, 1915, and had only recently rejoined his regiment. The funeral was on 6th inst., at Leysdown, Isle of Sheppey, and took place with full military honours. His father has been many years the London manager of the China Japan Trading Company.

Extract from London and China Telegraph - Monday 11 September 1916, page 9:

Lieutenant LOTHROP LEWIS DE BERNIERE SMITH, Rifle Brigade, has died in hospital at Sheerness, from injuries received just before midnight on 2nd inst., in a collision between a motor cycle which he was riding and a taxicab. Lieutenant Metcalfe, who was also riding on the cycle, was slightly injured. Lieutenant Smith had served at the front, and was seriously wounded near Ypres in May, 1915, and only lately rejoined his regiment. He was the third son of Mr. and Mrs. J. de Berniere Smith, 4, Gloucester-gate, Regent's Park. Born in St. Katharine's Precinct, Regent's Park, Aug. 24, 1893, he was educated at Scaitcliffe School, Charterhouse (Girdlestones) and Magdalen College, Oxford, and was a member of the O.T.C. at the two latter places. He got his commission Aug. 15, 1914. The funeral took place on 6th inst., at Leysdown, Isle of Sheppey, and took place with full military honours. His father has been many years the London manager of the China and Japan Trading Company.

SMITH

Sergius Holland

2nd Lieut Sergius Holland Smith
Second Lieutenant Sergius
Holland Smith
© Lives of the First World War
Second Lieutenant, 4th Battalion attached 2nd Battalion, South Staffordshire Regiment. Killed in action 24 November 1915. Born 7 December 1891. In the 1901 census he was aged 9, born Russia, son of Berthold H and Nadejda mith, resident Kingsnympton Park, Kingsnympton, South Molton, Devon. in the 1911 census he was aged 19, born Russia boarding with his mother Nadejda Smith at 5, Gwendoline Terrace, Woolacombe, Mortehoe, Devon. Educated Charterhouse and Trinity College, Cambridge University. No known grave. Commemorated on LOOS MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France. Panel 73 to 76. See also Trinity College, Cambridge.

Extract from England & Wales Government Probate Death Index 1916:

SMITH Sergius Holland of 27 The Boltons Kensington Middlesex died 24 November 1915 in Flanders Administration London 26 May to Nadejda Smith widow. Effects £163 18s. 1d.

Extract from Birmingham Daily Gazette - Friday 28 April 1916, page 6:

CASUALTY LIST.
LOSSES AMONG MIDLAND REGIMENTS.

Under various dates:— Previously reported missing now reported killed: Second-Liesutenant S. H. Smith, South Staffordshire Regiment; Second-Lieutenant J. H. Powell, South Staffordshire Regiment.

Extract from Birmingham Mail - Friday 28 April 1916, page 3:

LATEST CASUALTIES.
BIRMINGHAM AND SOUTH STAFFORDSHIRE
OFFICERS KILLED.

The casualty lists issued by the War Office last night contained the names of 36 officers (11 dead, 25 wounded and missing) and 488 non-commissioned and men (123 dead and 565 wounded and missing).

Two officers belonging to the South Staffordshire Regiment—Second-Lieut. Powell and Second-iaeut. S. H Smith—previoualy reported missing, are now killed.

The Secretary to the Admiralty announces three deaths.

The full list of casualties can inspected at the New Streert office the “Daily Post.”

SOAMES, MiD

Gilbert Horsman

Major Gilbert Horsman SoamesMajor, 1st Battalion, Prince Of Wales's Own (West Yorkshire Regiment). Killed in action 9 January 1917. Aged 37. Born 8 April 1879 in Hastings. Second son of Arthur W. Soames, M.P., of 18, Park Crescent, Portland Place, London; husband of Rose Eveline (nee Allason) Soames, of 2, Petersham Terrace, Gloucester Rd., South Kensington, London, married 5 November 1905 in St Mary Abbots, Kensington; two children, Robert Allason Horsman Soames 14 August 1906 and Valerie Horsman Soames 30 September 1908. His brother Maurice Gordon Soames also fell. Served as a Captain in the Lancashire Fusiliers 1900-1908, height 5 feet 11 inches, served in South African War transferred from Lancashire Fusiliers to West Yorkshire Regiment (2nd Battalion), 19 May 1908; in South Africa 16 May 1900-11 September 1902. Mentioned in Despatches (MiD). In the 1881 census he was aged 1, son of Arthur W and Eveline Soames, resident 3, The Mount, Hastings St Leonard on Sea, Hastings, Sussex. In the 1891 census he was aged 11, born St Leonard, Sussex, a scholar at School, Bilton Grange, Bilton, Rugby, Warwickshire. In the 1911 census he was aged 31, born Hastings, Sussex, in the army as a Captain, West Yorkshire Regiment, married to Rose Eveline Soames with one son and one daughter, resident 108, Bootham, York, Yorkshire & Yorkshire (East Riding). Buried in CAMBRIN CHURCHYARD EXTENSION, Pas de Calais, France. Row T. Grave 18.

Extract from the Charterhouse Register, Oration Quarter 1893:

Soames, Gilbert Horsman. b. 8 April, 1879. (Girdlestoneites); Left O.Q., 1895. - Joined Lancashire Fusiliers, 1900; served in S. African War, attached to Army Service Corps, 1900-02.
O. H. Soames, Esq., 18, Park Crescent, Portland Place, W.

Extract from England & Wales Government Probate Death Index 1917:

SOAMES Gilbert Horsman of 33 Courtfield-gardens Middlesex died 9 January 1917 in France killed in action Probate London 4 June to Rose Eveline Soames widow.
Effects £798 1s. 4d.

Extract from Diss Express - Friday 19 January 1917, page 5:

MAJOR G. H. SOAMES KILLED IN ACTION.

Among the casualties officially reported on Wednesday was the name of Major Gilbert Horsman Soames (West Yorkshire Regt.), who was killed in action. He was a son of Mr. A. W. Soames, M.P., and was born in 1879, and received his commission in the Lancashire Fusiliers in April, 1900. He had promotion in October, 1900, and was captain in 1905. Afterwards he transferred to the West Yorkshires, and his majority was gazetted in September, 1915. In July last year he received the rank of temporary lieut.- colonel with a Service battalion of the regiment. Major Soames fought in the South African War of 1899-1902, and took part in the fighting in the Transvaal, the Orange River OClony, and Cape Colony. His decorations were the Queen's medal with three clasps, and the King’s medal with two clasps.

Extract from Essex Newsman - Saturday 3 February 1917, page 5, and Chelmsford Chronicle - Friday 2 February 1917, page 4:

Major Gilbert Horsman Soames, West Yorkshire Regt., killed Jan. 9, was the second son of Mr. Arthur W. Soames. M.P. for South Norfolk, and entered the Army early in the South African War, joining first the Essex Militia, and then the Lancashire Fusiliers. Subsequently he was transferred to the West Yorkshire Regt.

SOUTHERN

Edward Baxter

Private PS/5650, 20th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment). Died of wounds 21 July 1916. Aged 24. Born and enlisted Manchester, resident Southport. Son of Charles and Ann Corns Southern, of 3, Grosvenor Rd., Birkdale, Southport. In the 1901 census he was aged 9, born Salford, Lancashire, son of Charles and Ann C Southern, resident 13, Westbourne Road, Birkdale, Ormskirk, Lancashire. Buried in MERICOURT-L'ABBE COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION, Somme, France. Plot II. Row E. Grave 11.

Extract from From the Southport Visiter - 1 August 1916:

Son of Mr and Mrs Chas Southern. Nephew of A Yates Baxter of Birkdale. Pte Southern was educated at Charterhouse and Oriel College, Oxford, where he took his B.A. degree in September 1914. Immediately afterwards he enlisted in the University and Public Schools Battalion, and was attached to a battalion of the Royal Fusiliers, serving in France since November.

Extract from England & Wales Government Probate Death Index 1917:

SOUTHERN Edward Baxter of 3 Grosvenor-road Birkdale Lancashire private R.F. died 21 July 1916 in France or Belgium on active service Administration London 17 March to Charles Southern yarn agent.
Effects £351 12s.

SPARKS

James Elliot

Lieutenant, 4th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers. Killed in action 21 July 1916. Aged 21. Son of James Douglas Sparks; brother of Robert Lionel Sparks. In the 1901 census he was aged 6, born Guernsey, Channel islands, grandson of George A and Blanche W Elliott, resident 57, Clarence Parade, Town, Portsmouth, Hampshire. In the 1911 census he was aged 16, born Guernsey, a school boarder, resident Hogsoniter, Godalming, Surrey. Educated Charterhouse and University College, Oxford University, matriculated 1913. Member of University OTC prior to 1915. No known grave. Commemorated on Thiepval Memorial, Somme, France. Pier and Face 8 C 9 A and 16 A. He also has a memorial that is located on the south side of the chancel, to the left of the vestry door, in Holy Trinity Church, Sheen Park, Richmond and takes the form of a white marble plaque on a green marble backgound. See also Richmond, Surrey.

TO THE GLORY OF GOD AND
IN LOVING MEMORY OF
JAMES ELLIOT SPARKS,
LIEUT. 4TH BATT. ROYAL FUSILIERS.
KILLED IN ACTION
AT THE BATTLE OF THE SOMME
21ST JULY 1916, AGED 21 YEARS

Extract from England & Wales Government Probate Death Index 1916:

SPARKS James Elliot of 100 Church-road Richmond Surrey lieutenant 4th battalion Royal Fusiliers died 21 July 1916 in France on active service Probate London 7 December to Robert Watson Sparks colonel retired H. M. Army.
Effects £2484 3s. 10d.

Extract from West Sussex Gazette - Thursday 3 August 1916, page 2:

Lieutenant James Elliot Sparks, Royal Fusiliers (killed is action on July 22), was the elder son of the late Major J. D Sparks and grandson of Colonel Sparks, Richmond, Surrey. He was twenty-one years of age. and was gazetted to the Royal Fusiliers in December, 1914; be had his second star in September of last year.

SPENCER

Charles James

Captain Charles James Spencer
Captain Charles James Spencer
© IWM (HU 126766)
Captain Charles James Spencer
Captain Charles James Spencer
Captain, 2nd Battalion, Devonshire Regiment. Killed in action 18 December 1914. Aged 35. Baptised 17 March 1879 in Leicester, St Matthew's, Leicestershire. Son of Charles Alfred and Mary Spencer, of Leicester; husband of Katharine Margaret Spencer, of Crapstone House, Yelverton, Devon, married 20 October 1909 in Pennycross, St Pancras, Devon. In the 1881 census he was aged 2, born Leicester, Leicestershire, son of Charles A and Mary Spencer, resident Claremont Place, 1, London Road, Leicester St Margaret, Leicester, Leicestershire. In the 1911 census he was aged 32, born Leicester, Leicestershire, a Captain in Devonshire Regiment, married to Katherine M Spencer with one son. Height 5 feet 8½ inches. Buried in AUBERS RIDGE BRITISH CEMETERY, AUBERS, Nord, France. Plot IV. Row F. Grave 3.

Extract from the Charterhouse Register, Oration Quarter 1892:

Spencer, Charles James. b. 10 Jan., 1879. (Robin ites-Bodeites); Left C.Q., 1896. - Joined Devon Regt., 1899; served in S. African War, severely wounded, 1899-1902.
C. J. Spencer, Esq., Stoughton Lane, Leicester.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 1, page 371:

CAPTAIN CHARLES JAMES SPENCER, 2nd BATTN. DEVONSHIRE REGIMENT, son of C. A. Spencer, was born at Leicester on the 10th January, 1879. He was educated by the Rev. Bode, Yarlet Hall, Stafford, and afterwards at Charterhouse.

Captain Spencer was gazetted to the 2nd Battalion Devonshire Regiment as 2nd Lieutenant from the Cardigan Artillery Militia in 1899, became Lieutenant in May, 1901, and obtained his company in July, 1908. He was Adjutant of the 7th Cyclist Battalion Devonshire Regiment from 1908-12. He served with distinction in the South African War, in which he was severely wounded, and was present at the relief of Ladysmith; operations in the Transvaal, the Orange Free State, and on the Tugela Heights; and action at Laing's Nek. He was employed with the Mounted Infantry. For these services he received the Queen's medal with five clasps and the King's medal with two clasps.

Captain Spencer was killed on the 18th December, 1914, while leading his company in an attack on the German trenches.

He was a member of the Junior United Service Club, and his recreations were hunting, polo, and shooting.

He married, in 1909, Katherine Margaret, youngest daughter of the late Robert Bayly, of Torr, Plymouth, and left one son, Charles Richard, born 5th December, 1910.

Extract from De Ruvigny's Roll of Honour 1914-1918, volume 1, page 335:

SPENCER, CHARLES JAMES, Capt., 2nd Battn. Devonshire Regt., eldest s. of Charles Alfred Spencer, of Stoughton Lane, Leicester, by his wife, Mary, dau. of James Warwick. of Longthorpe, near Peterborough; b. Leicester, 10 Jan. 1879; educ. Charterhouse; joined the Cardigan Artillery Militia in 1898; gazetted 2nd Lieut. to the Devonshire Regt., 18 Oct. 1899, and promoted Lieut., 11 May. 1901, and Capt., 14 July, 1908; served in the South African War, 1899-1902; took part in the advance on, and relief of Ladysmith, being with the 2nd Battn. in Major-Gen. Hildeyard's Brigade, while the 1st Battn. was shut up in the town; operations of 17-24 Jan. 1900, and action at Spion Kop; operations of 5-7 Feb. 1900, and action at Vaal Kranz; operations on Tugela Heights (14-27 Feb. 1900) and action at Pieters Hill; operations in Natal, March to June 1900, including action at Laings Nek (6-9 June); and those in the Transvaal, Nov. 1901 to 31 May, 1902; was severely wounded and received the Queen's medal with five clasps and King's medal with two clasps. He was Adjutant of the 7th (Territorial) Cyclist Battn. of the Devonshires from 14 July, 1908 to 29 Feb. 1912. On the outbreak of war he went to France with the Expeditionary Force, 5 Nov. 1914, and was killed in action 18 Dec. 1914, while leading his company in an attack on the German trenches. Buried near Estaires. Capt. Spencer m. at Pennycross Church, near Plymouth, 20 Oct. 1909, Katherine Margaret (Crapstone House, Yelverton, South Devon), yst. dau. of the late Robert Bayly, of Torr, Plymouth, and had a son, Charles Richard, b. 5 Dec. 1910.

Extract from England & Wales Government Probate Death Index 1915:

SPENCER Charles James of Stoughton-lane Leicester died 18 December 1914 in France on active service Probate London 20 May to Robert Walter Kaye esquire and Harry Flude solicitor. Effects £1517 5s. 6d.

Extract from Volunteer Service Gazette and Military Dispatch - Wednesday 26 August 1908, page 11:

7th Batt. Devonshire Regiment (Cyclists).—Lieut. Charles James Spencer, the Devonshire Regiment, to be Adjutant—July 14, 1908. Lieut. Charles J. Spencer, the Devonshire Regiment, is granted the temporary rank of Captain whilst Adjutant—July 14, 1908.

Extract from Western Times - Tuesday 29 December 1914, page 6, and Western Times - Saturday 26 December 1914, page 4:

Captain Charles James Spencer, Devonshire Regiment, another victim of the war was gazetted second lieutenant from the Militia in 1899, and obtained his company in 1908. From 1908 to 1912 he served as adjutant, Territorial Force. He was severely wounded in the South African War, where he was present at the relief of Ladysmith and at the actions at Spion Kop, Vaal Kranz, Tugela Heights, Pieters Hill, and Laings Nek. He received the Queen's medal with five clasps and the King's medal with two clasps. Captain Spencer was born in 1879.

Extract from Broad Arrow - Friday 08 January 1915, page 29:

Capt. Charles James Spencer, 2nd Bn. Devonshire Regiment, who was killed in action on the 18th ult., in France, was the eldest son of C. A. Spencer, of Stoughton Lane, Leicester. Born in 1879, he joined the Line from the Militia in 1899, and was promoted captain in 1908. He saw considerable active service in the South African War of 1899-1902, including the relief of Ladysmith.

Extract from Leicester Evening Mail - Tuesday 25 May 1915, page 4:

LOCAL WILLS.
Estate of the Late Capt. Charles James Spencer.

LONDON, Tuesday.

Captain Charles James Spencer, 2nd Battalion Devonshire Regiment, of Stoughton Lane, Leicester, who took part in the South African War, and who was killed in France on December 18th last, aged 35 years, left uunsettled property of the gross value of £1,517 5s. 6d., and £1,510 14s. 6d. in net personality.

Probate of his will has been granted to Robert Walter Kaye, of Great Glen Manor, Leicester, and Harry Flude, of 29, Prior Lane, Leicester, solicitor, power being reserved to make a like grant to the other executor.

Extract from Leicester Chronicle - Saturday 29 May 1915, page 5:

CAPTAIN C. J. SPENCER'S WILL.

Charles James Spencer 2nd Battalion Devonshire Regiment, of Stoughton-lane. Leicester, who took part the South African War, and who was killed in France December 18th last, aged35 years, left unsettled property of the gross value £1,517 5s 6d and £1,510 14s. 6d in net personalty. Probate of his will have been granted to Robert Walter Kaye, of Glen Manor, Leicester, and Harry Flude, of 29, Friar-lane, Leicester, solicitor, power being reserved to make a like grant to the other executor.

Extract from Leicester Evening Mail - Tuesday 25 May 1915, page 4:

CAPTAIN C. J. SPENCER'S WILL.

Captain Charles James Spencer, 2nd Battalion Devonshire Regiment, of Stoughton-lane, Leicester, who took part in the South African War, and who was killed in France on December 18th last, aged 35 years, left unsettled property of the gross value of £1,517 5s. 6d. and £1,510 14s 6d. in net personalty. Probate of his will have been granted to Robert Walter Kaye, of Great Glen Manor, Leicester, and Harry Flude, of 29, Friar-lane, Leicester, solticitor, power being reserved to make a like grant to the other executor.

SPENCER

Henry Beresford

Captain, West Somerset Yeomanry (Territorial) attached to Tank Corps. Killed in action 2 September 1918. Aged 37. Born 5 July 1881. Son of Henry Montagu and Ethel Louisa Spencer; husband of Dorothy Acton (nee Farrer) Spencer, of 5, Richmond Rd., Exmouth, married January to March Quarter 1908 in Shipton on Stour Registration District, Warwickshire. In the 1891 census he was aged 9, born Paxford, Worcestershire, apupil, resident Lindley Lodge, Higham Fields, Higham on the Hill, Hinckley, Leicestershire. In the 1911 census he was aged 29, born Paxford, Worcestershire, a Farmer, married to Dorothy Acton Spencer, resident Bellivor Hoo, Meavy, Yelverton, Devon. Educated Charterhouse and Brasenose College, Oxford University. Buried in QUEANT ROAD CEMETERY, BUISSY, Pas de Calais, France. Plot Vi. Row E. Grave 15.

Extract from the Charterhouse Register, Oration Quarter 1894:

Spencer, Henry Beresford. b. 5 July, 1881. (Gownboys); Left C.Q., 1899. B.N.C., Oxf.-Joined 2 V.B. Gloucestershire Regt., 1901; served in S. African War with Vol. Co. Gloucestershire Regt. -Joined Irish Constabulary, 1903.
H. B. Spencer, Esq., Cotswold House, Blockley, Worcestershire.

Extract from England & Wales Government Probate Death Index 1919:

SPENCER Henry Beresford of 5 Richmond-road Exmouth Devonshire died 2 September 1918 in France or Belgium Administration London 17 January to Dorothy Acton Spencer widow. Effects £1014 7s. 7d.

Extract from Shepton Mallet Journal - Friday 22 January 1915, page 2, and Western Daily Press - Friday 15 January 1915, page 10, and Wells Journal - Friday 22 January 1915, page 5::

LOCAL COMMISSIONS.

A special supplement the London Gazette, issued Thursday night, contains the following appointments ; —
. . . .
West Somerset: Lance-Corpl. Henry Beresford Spencer, from the Royal 1st Devon Yeomarry, to second-lieutenant, dated 15th January.

SPRING-RICE

Gerald

Lieut Gerald Spring-Rice
Lieutenant Gerald Spring-Rice
© Lives of the First World War
[Also listed in some records as Gerald Spring RICE] Lieutenant. Born 13 September 1864, 3rd son of the Hon. C.W.T. and Elizabeth Spring-Rice of Mt. Trenchard, Foynes; husband of Mary Isabella Spring Rice, of Gatesgarth, Penrith, Cumberland, married April to June Quarter 1905 in Oenrith Registration District, Cumberland. He was at Charterhouse [L] 1877-1882 and at the Royal Agricultural College, Cirencester. He became a farmer and rancher. In the 1881 census he was aged 16, born Limlico, Middlesex, a school boarder, resident Sandy Lane, Godalming, Guildford, Surrey. In the 1901 census he was aged 36, born London, Middlesex, resident with his sister, Agnes Spring Rice, at 24, Bryanston Street, St Marylebone, Marylebone, London & Middlesex. Sailed for Montreal, Quebec, Canada, from Liverpool 24 August 1905, with his wife, aboard the "Canada" of the Dominion Line. In the Great War he was commissioned into the Border Regiment and joined 11th Battalion. He was killed in action on 27 May 1916. His grave is at AUTHUILE MILITARY CEMETERY, AUTHUILLE, Somme, France. Row C. Grave 9. Also commemorated on Watermillock War Memorial, Cumbria.

Extract from the Charterhouse Register, Long Quarter 1877:

Spring-Rice, Gerald. b. 13 Sept., 1864. (Lockites); Junior Scholar Left O.Q., 1882.-R.A.C., Cirencester.-Farmer & Rancher.
G. Spring-Rice, Esq., Pense, Assa, Canada.

Extract from Penrith Observer - Tuesday 6 June 1916, page 3:

Local War Notes and Incientsd
THE ROLL OF HONOUR.
LIEUT. GERALD SPRING-RICE KILLED.
FATAL EFFECT OF SNIPER'S SPENT BULLET.

On Tuesday afternoon, immediately after the second edition of the " Observer " had gone to press, a rumour was circulated in Penrith that Lieut. Gerald Spring-Rice, Gowbarrow Old Hall, had been killed in action in France. Inquiries showed that the information was only too true. Mrs. Spring-Rice was engaged in her voluntary work of a V.A.D. nurse at the St. Andrew's Military Hospital, Penrith, and to Mrs. Foster, the matron, fell the duty of breaking the sad news to her friend and near neighbour. The first intelligence came in an official telegram from the War Office, but later in the week Mrs. Spring- Rice received a letter from Colonel Machell, the Commanding Officer of the Lonsdale Battalion of the Border Regiment, telling how the event happened. Lieut. Spring-Rice was going along the front with a Sergeant in search of a suitable place to which to bring supplies, he being the transport officer to the battalion. Suddenly Lieut. Spring-Rice put up his hand, said "I'm hit," and died within a minute or two. The sergeant at once obtained help, but it was of no avail. Subsequent investigation showed that the fatal missile was a spent bullet which had come from a sniper's rifle. It struck him immediately over the heart, and death was caused by syncope.

Lieut. Spring-Rice was third son of the Hon. Charles William Thomas Spring-Rice, second son of the first Lord Monteagle. Mr. Spring-Rice in 1855 married Elizabeth Margaret, eldest daughter of Mr. William Marshall, M.P., Hallsteads and Patterdale Hall, and they had a large family. The second son was Sir Cecil Spring-Rice, now British Ambassador to the United States. Mr. Gerald Spring-Rice was born on Sept. 13th, 1864, and was educated at Cbarterbouse, afterwards going to the Royal Agricultural College at Cirencester, having decided on a colonial career. In 1883 he went to Canada, where he in conjunction with his brother took up ranching. He lived there for over 25 years, and was a benefactor to the empire. He bought a large area, much of it rough prairie, and turned it into highly productive farms.

In 1905 Mr. Spring-Rice married Miss Mary Isabella Bush, second daughter of the late Mr. John Bush, Beauthorn. They had two sons, both of whom died young. On returning to England Mr. Spring-Rice took up his residence at Watermillock, and a few years ago purchased the Mellfell House estate from the representatives of the late Dr. Romney. There he intended to settle, and considerable improvements had been made to the property.

When the Voluntary Aid movement was started, a considerable time before war was thought about, Mr. Spring-Rice displayed the keenest possible interest in it, and on the resignation of General Dawson-Scott, through illness, he undertook the arduous, and often thankless, duties of County Director, after the scheme had got beyond the initial stage. He travelled thousands of miles in the course of his organising work, and never thought any labour too great so long as he could secure efficiency. When the first train load of wounded came to Penrith and Carlisle his arrangements proved to have been excellently conceived, and so far as Penrith was concerned they were as admirably carried out. In recognition of his services to the Voluntary Aid and Territorial Association work he was last year made a Deputy Lieutenant of Cumberland.

Last summer, though then in his fiftieth year, Mr. Spring-Rice felt that he ought to take a more active part in the war, and in July Colonel Machell offered him the position of transport officer to the Lonsdales, with the rank of Lieutenant. This he accepted, went to France in November, and gave untiring devotion to the work to the day of his untimely death. He was beloved by the men and by all who knew him—and they were many; for a kindlier and less obtrusive man could not be found in the British army or in social life. He was succeeded in the office of County Director by Mr. Henry Gandy, Skirsgill Park. Mr. Spring-Rice was en enthusiastic lover of the Lake District, and was a keen walker. He thought nothing of walking from his home over the fells to Kendal in a day, with knapiack on back, returning next day by the same means but by a different route.

The London correspondent of the "Daily Dispatch" says:

People in the north country, and especially in the Lake District, will be particularly sorry to hear of the death of Mr. Gerald Spring-Rice—a very shining example of determination to serve the country in the field in spite of the handicap of age, for Mr. Spring-Rice, who was a Lieutenant in the Border Regiment, would have been 52 next September. Though the Spring-Rice family is Irish and the family place is in Limerick, there has been a considerable Cumbrian association, for Mr. Spring-Rice's father, the Hon. Charles, second son of the first Lord Monteagle, married the eldest daughter of Mr. William Marshall, M.P. Patterdale Hell. He was at one time Assistant Permanent Under-Secretary at the Foreign Office, and his two elder sons carried on the Whitehall tradition, for the first, who died some years ago, was a principal clerk at the Treaeury and auditor of the Civil List, and the second, after a distinguished Foreign Office and diplomatic career, is now Ambassador at Washington.

Extract from Penrith Observer - Tuesday 6 June 1916, page 3, and Aberdeen Press and Journal - Thursday 1 June 1916, page 4, and The Scotsman - Wednesday 31 May 1916, page 8, and Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer - Wednesday 31 May 1916, page 4:

LIEUTENANT G. SPRING-RICE KILLED.

A telegram was received at Watermillock from the War Office yesterday reporting the death of Lieutenant Gerald Spring-Rice, Border Regiment. He was the younger brother Sir Cecil Spring-Rice, British Ambassador to the United Slates. He was killed in action on Saturday. —Lieutenant' Spring-Rice was 52 years of age, and joined last year as transport officer after a period of very valuable service as County Director for Cumberland of the Voluntary Aid Detachments. His wife was nursing' in Penrith Military Hospital when the sad news was broken to her.

SQUIRES

Robert Dewar

[Listed as Roger Dewar SQUIRES on SDGW] Captain, 9th Battalion, Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment). Killed in action 9 August 1915. Aged 27. Son of the late Rev. Robert Alfred and Mrs. Jessie Ethel Squires. In the 1911 census he was aged 23, unmarried, born Clifton, Somerset, a serving soldier, Second Lieutenant, G And H Companies, 1st Battalion, Sherwood Foresters, billeted at Gough Barracks, Trimulgherry, Deccan, India. No known grave. Commemorated on HELLES MEMORIAL, Turkey (including Gallipoli). Panel 151 to 153. Also commemorated on St Albans War Memorial and also Normanton-by-Derby, Derbyshire.

Extract from England & Wales Government Probate Death Index 1915:

SQUIRES Robert Dewar of Darfield Hall Place-gardens St. Albans Hertfordshire died 9 August 1915 at Gallipoli Peninsula Probate London 30 November to the Public Trustee. Effects £18660 16s. 9d.
Resworn £18883 19s 5d.

Extract from Belfast News-Letter - Thursday 26 August 1915, page 8:

The death in action in France on 5th November, 1914, of Major J. B. Corry, D. S.O., Royal Engineers, son of the late Mr. John Corry, Belfast, and nephew of the late Sir James P. Corry, M.P., is recalled by the official announcement that Captain Robert Dewar Squires, 9th Battalion Sherwood Foresters, was killed in action at the Dardanelles between the 7th and 11th inst. Captain Souires was member of the Alpine Club, and had climbed in Switzerland and in Kashmir, where, with the late Major Corry, made the first ascent of Kolahoi in 1911.

Extract from Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer - Wednesday 25 August 1915, page 4:

CAPTAIN ROBERT DEWAR SQUIRES, 9th Sherwood Foresters, who was killed at the Dardanelles between August 7 and 11, was the younger son of the late Rev. R. A. Squires, formerly of the Church Missionary Society, and for many years vicar of St. Peter, St. Albana, and was educated at Charterhouse. He received his first commission in the Sherwood Foresters from the Militia in 1910, and was posted to the first battalion in India. In 1913 he was transferred to the depot of his regiment, and soon after the outbreak of war was appointed company commander in the 9th Battalion, with which he went to the Dardanelles in July.

Extract from Kent & Sussex Courier - Friday 27 August 1915, page 5:

Captain Robert Dewar Squires, of the Sherwood Foresters, who is reported killed in action in the Dardanelles, is the younger son of the late Rev. B. A. Squires, who was a curate at Holy Trinity, Tunbridge Wells, in the nineties. The deceased officer was 27, and was a well-known Alpine climber.

Extract from Birmingham Daily Post - Monday 30 August 1915, page 4:

SQUIRES, Capt. R. D., 9th Battalion Sherwood Foresters.

[Captain Robert Dewar Squires was the younger son of the late Rev. R. S. Squires, vicar of St. Peter’s, St. Albans. He received his first commission in the Sherwood Foresters from the Militia in 1910, and was posted to the 1st Battalion in India. In 1913 he was transferred to the depot of his regiment, and after the outbreakof war was appointed a company commander in the 9th Battalion.]

Extract from The Scotsman - Saturday 4 December 1915, page 8, and Daily News (London) - Saturday 4 December 1915, page 3:

SCOTTISH AND OTHER WILLS

Robert Dewar Squires, of Darfield Hall, St Albans, Herts, who was killed in action in Gallipoli on August 9 last (net personalty, £18, 579) ...............................

£ 18,660

Extract from Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer - Saturday 4 December 1915, page 6:

RECENT WILLS

Captain Robert Dewar Squires, St. Albans, Herts, of the Sherwood Foresters, member of the Alpine Club, killed in action at Gallipoli on the 9lh August last...............................

£ 18,660

STACEY

Charles Noble

Lieutenant, "A" Company, 7th Battalion (Territorial), Duke of Cambridge's Own (Middlesex Regiment). Died of wounds 10 May 1915. Aged 20. Son of Edward and Jane Stacey, of Audley House, New Barnet, Herts. In the 1901 census he was aged 6, born new Barnet, Hertfordshire, son of Edward and Jane Stacey, resident Andley, Somerset Road, New Barnet, Hertfordshire. In the 1911 census he was aged 15, born New Barnet, Hertfordshire, a school boarder, resident Bodcites, Godalming, Surrey. Buried in RUE-PETILLON MILITARY CEMETERY, FLEURBAIX, Pas de Calais, France. Plot I. Row D. Grave 50.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice, Volume 2, page 440:

LIEUTENANT CHARLES NOBLE STACEY, 7th BATTN. (TERRIT.) THE DUKE OF CAMBRIDGE'S OWN (MIDDLESEX REGIMENT), of Audley House, New Barnet, Herts., was killed in action near Fromelles, France, on the 10th of May, 1915.

His Commanding Officer wrote of him: "He was one of the very best of my younger Officers, capable, reliable, hardworking, and, utterly fearless. His death is a great loss to his Battalion in which he will never be forgotten."

Lieutenant Stacey was the son of Edward Stacey, Audley House, New Barnet, by his marriage with Jane, daughter of Christopher Mounsey Wilson, J.P., of Manchester and of Hampton, Westmoreland, and a grandson of Charles Stacey, of Wickham Hall, Bishop's Stortford. He was born at New Barnet on the 24th September, 1894, and educated at Sandroyd, Cobham, and Charterhouse. He boxed for the latter School at Aldershot in 1913.

He received his commission in June, 1913, when he was gazetted 2nd Lieutenant and posted to the 7th Battalion Middlesex Regiment. In September, 1914, he went with his Regiment to Gibraltar, and, being promoted Lieutenant in November, 1914, he proceeded with his Battalion to France. He was unmarried.

Extract from Penrith Observer - Tuesday 18 May 1915, page 5:

LIEUT. STACEY KILLED.

A young officer with close family associations with Bampton has lost his life in the war. Lieut. Charles Noble Stacey, 7th Middlesex Regiment, who was killed is action on Sunday week, was the elder son of Mr. Edward Stacey, Audleyy House, New Barnet. He was educated at Charterhouse, became a solicitor, and at the tine of his death was in his 22nd year. Much sympathy is felt for the family of the young officer in Bampton, where be was well known. On Sunday morning the service at Bampton Church had special reference to the sad event. The Rev.G. E. F. Day, Vicar, in his sermon spoke highly of Lieut. Stacey, and at the close the Dead March was played on the organ.

Extract from Lancashire Evening Post - Thursday 20 May 1915, page 6:

Lieut. C. N. Stacey, of the 7th. Middlesex Regiment, who was killed in action on May 9th. was the elder son of Mr. E. Stacey, of New Barnet. He belonged to a well-known and much-esteemed old family in North Westmorland. His late grandfather, Mr. Christopher Mounsey Wilson, of Walmgate Head, Bampton, was a Manchester manufacturer, and the late lieutenant's uncle, the late Mr. C. M. Wilson, was a barrister on the Northern Circuit. A tragic happening is recalled in connection with the Wilson family's country home in Westmorland. Walmgate Head was burnt to the ground some twenty years ago, in the depth of winter, when Haweswater, the lake near by, was hard frozen, and the housekeeper, who was caretaker in the family's absence, was burned to death.

STANDRING

Benjamin Arthur

Second Lieutenant, 2nd Battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment. Died of wounds 19 December 1914. Aged 28. Born 26 September 1886. Son of Arthur Hamilton and Ellen Standring. In the 1901 census he was aged 14, born Portugal, a school boarder, resident Hindhead Road, Godalming, Guildford, Surrey. Buried in SAILLY-SUR-LA-LYS CHURCHYARD, Pas de Calais, France. Row A. Grave 9.

Extract from the Charterhouse Register, Oration Quarter 1900:

Standring, Benjamin Arthur . b. 26 Dec., 1886. (Bodeites).
B. A. Standring, 77, Rua Infante D'Henrique, Oporto, Portugal.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice, Volume 1, page 375:

2nd LIEUTENANT BENJAMIN ARTHUR STANDRING, 2nd BATTN. ROYAL WARWICKSHIRE REGIMENT, son of Arthur Hamilton and Ellen Standring, was born at Oporto, Portugal, on the 26th December, 1886, and was educated at the Oporto British School and Charterhouse (Bodeites).

He joined the 28th City of London Regiment (Artists' Rifles) in 1909, becoming successively Corporal and Sergeant, and with this corps he proceeded to join the Expeditionary Force in France in October, 1914. Shortly after the Artists' Rifles arrived in France they became an Officers' Training Corps, and in November, 1914, 2nd Lieutenant Standring received his commission in the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, which he joined at the front.

He died on the 19th December, 1914, of wounds received the same day in action at Rouges Banes, and was buried in the churchyard at Sailly-sur-Lys.

Extract from De Ruvigny's Roll of Honour 1914-1918, volume 4, page 195:

STANDRING, BENJAMIN ARTHUR, Lieut., The Royal Warwickshire Regt., only s. of Arthur Standring, of Oporto; served with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders, and was killed in action 19 Dec. 1914.

Extract from England & Wales Government Probate Death Index 1915:

STANDRING Benjamin Arthur of Heath Bank Blackheath Rise Lewisham-hill Kent died 19 December 1914 in France Administration London 27 February to Arthur Hamilton Standring wine merchant. Effects £1215 12s. 4d.

STAVELEY

George Hendley

Captain, 1st Battalion attached 2nd Battalion, King's Own (Yorkshire Light Infantry). Killed in action 14 April 1917. Aged 34. Born 14 February 1883, at Kabul, India. Baptised 4 March 1883 in Sattara, St Thomas, Bombay. Son of George Edmund Staveley (1st Bombay Lancers) and Frances Anne (Fanny) Staveley; husband of Lizette Staveley, of Lissenhall, Swords, Co. Dublin. In the 1911 census he was aged 28, born Sattara, Bombay, India, unmarried, a serving soldier, Lieutenant, 10th Battalion, King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry, billeted at Hong Kong, China. Buried in SERRE ROAD CEMETERY No. 2, Somme, France. Plot VII. Row F. Grave 4.

Extract from the Charterhouse Register, Cricket Quarter 1897:

Staveley, George Hendley. b. 14 Feb., 1883; (Robinites- Saunderites); Shooting VIII, 1899; Left O.Q., 1902.-Joined Yorkshire L.I., 1902.
G. H. Staveley, Esq., Glanmire, co. Cork

Extract from Irish Officers Died In The Great War, 1914-1919:

Captain George Hendley Staveley, 1st Batt. (attached 2nd) the King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry, was killed in action at dawn at the head of his Company on April 14th. He was educated at Temple Grove and at Charterhouse and Sandhurst, he received his commission and joined the 1st Batt, at Aldershot in 1903. He served in Gibraltar, South Africa, Hong Kong, and Singapore, where he was Intelligence Officer when war broke out. He returned with his regiment and went to France; he received a slight wound and remained on duty, but later was invalided home. He went out again in July last, and from August was acting Major for about six months.

Extract from London and China Telegraph - Monday 30 April 1917, page 13:

Captain GEORGE HENDLEY STAVELEY, the King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry, who was killed in action at dawn on April 14 at the head of his company, whilst the battalion was making a successful attack, was educated at Temple Grove, and afterwards at Charterhouse and Sandhurst. He received his commission and joined his battalion at Aldershot in 1903. He served in Gibraltar, South Africa, Hongkong, and Singapore, returning from the latter place with the K.O.Y.L.I.'s on the outbreak of war. He was acting major from last August for about six months. His Colonel writes of him: "The whole regiment mourns for him. He was a splendid officer, beloved by all ranks." Captain Staveley was an all-round sportsman and a fine rifle shot; in 1904 he was in the winning team for the Army Cup at Bisley, and also secured the Bronze Jewel of South Africa in 1909.

STEEL

James Campbell

[Not found on SDGW] Lieutenant, "D" Company, 1st Battalion, Princess Louise's (Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders). Died 13 March 1915. Born 16 May 1893 in 8 Kensington Palace gardens, London. Aged 21. Son of the late James Alison Steel and of Katherine Isabella Steel, of 29, Courtfield Road, London. French speaker. Height 5 feet 10½ inches. Served in Malta 14 September 1912 to 28 November 1912, in India from 29 November 1912. In the 1901 census he was aged 7, born Paddington, Middlesex, son of Katherine Steel (a widow), resident Hinstock House, Sycamore Avenue, Farnborough, Hartley Wintney, Hampshire. In the 1911 censsu he was aged 17, born Paddington ,London, a student, Gentleman cadet, Royal Military College, Camberley Surrey. Buried in DICKEBUSCH NEW MILITARY CEMETERY, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Row B. Grave 17.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice, Volume 2, page 443:

LIEUTENANT JAMES CAMPBELL STEEL, 1st BATTN. PRINCESS LOUISE'S (ARGYLL AND SUTHERLAND HIGHLANDERS), who was killed in action at St. Eloi on the 13th March, 1915, and buried at Dickebusch, Flanders, was the only son of the late James Alison Steel and of Mrs. Steel, 29, Court-field Road, London, S.W.

He was born in London on the 16th May, 1893, and was educated at Routenburn, Largs, Ayrshire, and at Charterhouse, where he won the Junior Challenge Cup for his House Weekites), proceeding afterwards to the R.M.C., Sandhurst. At the latter he was in the .Football XI., and won his Colours.

Mr. Steel received his first appointment in the Army in February, 1912, when he was gazetted 2nd Lieutenant in the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, and until September of that year he served with the 2nd Battalion, then joining the 1st Battalion at Malta. He went with the 1st Battalion to India, whence they returned in November, 1914, on their way to the front. Lieutenant Steel was promoted to that rank in December, 1914.

Extract from The Scotsman - Wednesday 17 March 1915, page 11:

AN A . AND S .H . OFFICER KILLED.

Lieutenant James Campbell Steel, 1st Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders ( killed), was the only son of the late James Alison Steel and of Mrs Steel, 29 Courtfield Road, London. He joined his regiment in 1912, and was promoted Lieutenant after war was declared.

Extract from Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer - Friday 9 April 1915, page 4:

Lieut. James Campbell Steel, the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, who was fatally shot througn the head at Neuve Chapelle, was the only son of Mrs. Steel (widow), of Courtfield Road, London, and was 21 years, of ape. Shortly after receiving his commission. Lieut. Steel went to India, returning with his regiment on the outbreak of the war. He was connected with St. Columba's Presbyterian Church, Walthamstow, where he exercised great influence on other young men.

STERNBERG

Edgar Adolph Joseph

Second Lieutenant. Born 16 June 1890. 1st son of Siegfried and Louise Sternberg, of 50, Whitworth St., Manchester; brother of Rupert (below). He was at Charterhouse [B] 1904 - 1908. In the 1901 census he was aged 10, born Manchester, Lancashire, son of Siegfried and Luise Sternberg, resident Lyndhurst, Didsbury, Chorlton, Lancashire. In the 1911 census he was aged 20, a University Student, born Manchester, Lancashire, son of Siegfried and Luise Sternberg, resident 120 Palatine Road, South Manchester, Lancashire. In the Great War he was commissioned into the King's Own (Royal Lancaster Regiment), he joined 11th Battalion, and was attached to 2nd Battalion. He was killed in action on 16 October 1916. His grave is at PHILOSOPHE BRITISH CEMETERY, MAZINGARBE, Pas de Calais, France. Plot I. Row H. Grave 26.

Extract from England & Wales Government Probate Death Index 1917:

STERNBERG Edgar Adolph Joseph of Lyndhurst West Didsbury Manchester second-lieutenant in the Royal Lancashire regiment died 16 October 1916 in France while in actual military service Administration Manchester 23 March to Siegfried Sternberg merchant. Effects £246 8s. 8d.

Extract from Lancashire Evening Post - Friday 20 October 1916, page 4:

KING’S OFFICER KILLED.

Second Lieut. Edgar A. J. Sternberg, King's Own Royal Lancaster Regiment, who was killed in action on October 16th, aged 26, was the eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. S. Sternberg, of Lyndhurst. West Didsbury. His younger brother, Second-Lieut. Rupert O. Sternberg. F.A., died of wounds Boulogne on July 1st this year.

STERNBERG

Rupert Oswald

Second Lieutenant. Born 19 June 1893, 2nd son of Siegfried and Louise Sternberg, of 50, Whitworth St., Manchester; brother of Edgar (above). In the 1901 census he was aged 7, born Manchester, Lancashire, son of Siegfried and Luise Sternberg, resident Lyndhurst, Didsbury, Chorlton, Lancashire. He was at Charterhouse [g] 1906 - 1911. In the 1911 census he was aged 17.born Manchester, Lancashire, a school boarder, resident Charterhouse, Godalming, Surrey. He went up to Clare College, Cambridge. In the Great War he was commissioned into the Royal Field Artillery and served with 83rd Battery. He was killed in action on 1 July 1916. His grave is at BOULOGNE EASTERN CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France. Plot II. Row A. Grave 38.

Extract from England & Wales Government Probate Death Index 1917:

STERNBERG Rupert Oswald of Lyndhurst West Didsbury Manchester a second-lieutenant in the Royal Field Artillery died 1 July 1916 at Boulogne Hospital 'France while in actual military service Administration Manchester 23 March to Siegfried Sternberg merchant. Effects £181 16s. 4d.

Extract from Lancashire Evening Post - Friday 20 October 1916, page 4:

KING’S OFFICER KILLED.

Second Lieut. Edgar A. J. Sternberg, King's Own Royal Lancaster Regiment, who was killed in action on October 16th, aged 26, was the eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. S. Sternberg, of Lyndhurst. West Didsbury. His younger brother, Second-Lieut. Rupert O. Sternberg. F.A., died of wounds Boulogne on July 1st this year.

STEWART, MiD

Charles Edward

Brigadier General. Born 27 September 1868 in Hampstead, London, 1st son of Charles Stewart. He married Katherine Maud McKenzie 12 October 1898 in Morimer near Reading, Berkshire. In the 1871 census he was aged 2, born Middlesex, son of Eliza J Stewart, resident Boundary Road, Hampstead, London & Middlesex. He was at Charterhouse [W] 1882 - 1886. He was commissioned into the Black Watch. French speaker. Height 5 feet 9½ inches. Served in South Africa 26 April 1896 to 23 June 1897 and 22 October 1899 to 21 June 1902, served in East Indies from 13 November 1912. Mentioned in Lord Roberts Despatch 4 September 1901 (MiD). Adjutant 6th Battery, V.R.H. from 18 December 1903. In the Great War he commanded 154th Infantry Brigade late 1st Battalion, Black Watch (Royal Highlanders). He was appointed C.M.G. He was killed in action at Houplines on 14 September 1916. His grave is at CITE BONJEAN MILITARY CEMETERY, ARMENTIERES, Nord, France. Plot II. Row F. Grave 2.

Extract from the Charterhouse Register, Oration Quarter 1882:

Stewart, Charles Edward. b. 27 Sept., 1868. (Weekites); Left C.Q., 1886.-Joined the Black Watch, 1889; Capt., 1898; served in S. African War, as Brigade Signalling Officer,* 1899-1902.
Capt. C. E. Stewart, Army & Navy Club, S.W.

Extract from Irish Officers Died In The Great War, 1914-1919:

Brigadier General Charles Edward Stewart, C.M.G., Black Watch, was killed in action on September 14th, 1916, in his 47th year. He was a grandson of the late Mr. Charles Copland, of Monkstown, Co. Dublin, and obtained his commission in the Black Watch in 1889. He served through the South African War as Brigade-Major, and took part in the advance on Kimberley and subsequent operations. He was mentioned in despatches and held both medals with six clasps. For his services in the present war he was awarded the C.M.G.

Extract from Perthshire Constitutional & Journal - Monday 18 September 1916, page 5:

BRIGADIER-GENERAL STEWART. C.M.G..
BLACK WATCH

Brigadier-General Charles Edward Stewart, C.M.G., the Royal Highlanders (the Black Watch), who has been killed in action, entered the Army in 1889 when in his 21st year. From first to last of his 27 years' service he remained uninterruptedly associated with the Royal Highlanders. As Major he served throughout the whole of the South African War, taking part in the advance on Kimberley, including the action at Magersfontein, was mentioned in dispatches, and received the Queen's medal with four clasps and the King's medal with two clasps. He was promoted Lieutenant-Colonel at the outbreak of the present war. Last year the honour of C.M.G. was conferred upon him, end in Jauary last he was rasied to the temporary rank of Brigadier-General. He was 47 years of age.

Extract from Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer - Tuesday 19 September 1916, page 4:

BRIGADIER-GENERAL CHARLES EDWARD STEWART C.M.G.. the Black Watch (killed action September 14), bom September, 1868. and entered the Royal Highlanders April, 1889. in January of this year he was appointed to the Staff, and given a brigade command. In the South African War General Stewart was on the Staff. He was in the advance on Kimberley, fought at Magersfontein, and took part in other operations, receiving, in addition to mention in despatches, the Queen's and tho King's Medals with six clasps. For service in the present war he was made C.M.G.

STEWART

Charles Edward

Lieutenant-Colonel. Born 3 September 1868, son of Major General Robert Crosse Stewart and Mrs. Fanny Stewart, husband of Mabel Gladys Stewart. Baptised 2 December 1868 in All Saints, Ennismore Gardens, Knightsbridge, Middlesex. He was at Charterhouse [L] 1882 - 1884. He was commissioned into the Royal Artillery. In the Great War he served with 190th Brigade, Royal Field Artillery. Captain in Royal Artillery during the Anglo-Boer War 1899-1902. He died of wounds on 31 August 1916, aged 47. His grave is at DANTZIG ALLEY BRITISH CEMETERY, MAMETZ, Somme, France. Plot I. Row B. Grave 33.

Extract from the Charterhouse Register, Oration Quarter 1882:

Stewart, Charles Edward. b. 3 Sept., 1868. (Lockites); Left L.Q., 1884.-Joined R.A., 1888; served on N.W. Frontier of India, 1897, '98; Capt., 1898; served in S. African War, 1900-'02;
Capt. C. E. Stewart, Army & Navy Club, S.W.

Extract from West Sussex Gazette - Thursday 14 September 1916, page 3:

100 YEARS' SOLDIER FAMILY.

Lieut.-Colonel Charles Edward Stewart. Royal Field Artillery, who has fallen in action, was the eldest surviving son of the late Major-General Roberts Crosse Stewart, C. B., and of Mrs. Stewart, of Royal-avenue, Chelsea, who for many years lived at Palmeira Mansions, Hove. Thus another member of a remarkable family, whom association with the Army has extended over 100 years, has given his life for King and country. Colonel Stewart's grand-father, the late Major Archibald Stewart, K.H., Rifle Brigade, distinguished himself at Waterloo, where, as a Lieut. of the 95th Rifle Corps, he, to quote from the official record, "Formed the 27th Regiment into line from square, and made a gallant charge on the French Imperial Guards, at Waterloo, on the evening of June 18th, 1815, no officer of the regiment having been left on the field but one young Ensign." The late Major- General Robert Crosse Stewart. C. B., father of the gallant officer whose death we now record, was recommended by the Duke of Wellington to QesQueenee Victoria for a commission on account of his father's services in the Peninsula and Waterloo, and gazetted to 84th Regiment, 1842.He performed a gallant deed in connection with the siege and capture of Lucknow, securing water for troops in face of great danger and being severely wounded, his horse also was wounded in three places. He was mentioned in dispatches and awarded medal, with clasp and brevet of Major. He was Adjutant-General of the Madras Army at the Imperial Assemblage at Delhi, 1st January, 1877, when Queen Victoria's assumption of the title of Empress of India was celebrated. In conversation with the writer of this little sketch a short time before his death, General Stewart insisted that the correct spelling of the name of the great Indian city is " Dehli—the " h " before the "l" and not that commonly in use; while, of the event itself, he wrote (17/3/12)—the letter is before us—" I am prouder of my position there than of any event in my career, for that assembly made history. I now am the only survivor of the four officers (representing the Government and the three Armies of India—Bengal, Madras, and Bombay) who, on horseback made the front rank of the spectators to witness the review of the troop, British and Indian. Many great swells, dukes, &c., were there on elephants, but they were behind us." General Stewart, who was spared to the great age of 90 years, lost one son in the South African War, and now another has nobly given his life for King and country.

Lieut.-Colonel Charles Edward Stewart was educated at Charterhouse, and entered Woolwich in January, 1886, receiving his commission in the Royal Field Artillery in January, 1888. Lieut.-Colonel Stewart served in the North-West Frontier campaign of 1887 and the South African War, and retired in 1908 with the rank of major. Rejoining the Army at the outbreak of war, he was promoted to temporary lieutenant-colonel in September, 1915. In the operations on the North-West Frontier in 1887-8 the gallant officer took part in the action of the Uhlan Pass. He was also with the Tirah Exepditionary Force, and received the Indian medal with three clasps. For his services in the South African War (1900-2) he was decorated with the Queen's medal with three clasps and the King's medal with two clasps. Lieut.-Colonel Stewart married, in 1915, Mabel Gladys, youngest daughter of the late William Pearson, of Liverpool. She survives him, and has one daughter.

A sister of the deceased officer, was an R.R.C. and a many-medalled Matron in Queen Alexandra's Imperial Nursing Service for over 21 years.

STIRLING

Norman William

Born 7 July 1861 (Australian records state 4 July 1861) at Urrbrae near Adelaide, South Australia. He was at Charterhouse [W] 1875 - 1878. Private 431, 2nd Field Ambulance, South African Medical Corps. Died of dysentery 14 November 1916. Aged 55. Son of Edward and Harriet Stirling; brother of Lancelot Stirling. Husband of Wilhelmina (nee Barry) Stirling, of Threadneedle Street, London, married 1885 in Victoria, Australia. Born Adelaide, South Australia. A sheep farmer. His grave is in MOROGORO CEMETERY, Tanzania. Plot IV. Row D. Grave 2.

His is one of the names added later to the Chapel panels, after their installation.

Extract from the Charterhouse Register, Cricket Quarter 1875:

Stirling, Norman William. b. 7 July, 1861. (Weekites); Left L.Q., 1878.
N. W. Stirling, Esq

STOKES

Reginald Alexander

Second Lieutenant, 9th Battalion, King's Own (Yorkshire Light Infantry). Killed in action by machine gun fire on railway during relief (10:30pm) 24 February 1917. Born 1 February 1891. Baptised 28 June 1891 in Byfleet, St Mary, Surrey. Son of the late Reginald Sewell Stokes and Elizabeth Clark Stokes, of Byfleet, Surrey. In the 1891 census hen was new born, born Byfleet, Surrey, son of Reginald S and Elizabeth C Stokes, resident Granmere, Mill Lane, Byfleet, Chertsey, Surrey. In the 1901 census he was aged 10, born Byfleet, Surrey, a pupil boarder, resident Hildersham House, St Peters Road, St Peter Intra, Thanet, Kent. In the 1911 census he was aged 20, born Byfleet, Surrey, an Articled Clerk (Solicitor), son of Elizabeth Stokes, resident 87 Queens Road Brentwood, Brentwood, Essex. Buried in CAMBRIN MILITARY CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France. Row H. Grave 5. Also listed on the Solicitors And Articled Clerks Memorial, Holborn, Greater London.

STRINGER

Frederick William

Lieutenant-Colonel, Royal Army Service Corps. Died on service 30 June 1916. Aged 43. Born 7 May 1873. Baptised 3 June 1873 in New Romney, St Nicholas, Kent. Son of Henry and Hariett Stringer, of New Romney; husband of Ruby Lowell Stringer, of 7, St. Mark's Court, London, N.W.8. In the 1881 census he was aged 7, born New Roney, kent, a Scholar, son of Henry and Arriet Stringer, resident The Elms, New Romney, Romney Marsh, Kent. In the 1891 census he was aged 17, born New Romney, Kent, a school boarder, resident Charterhouse, G S Davies, Prince of Wales Road, Godalming, Guildford, Surrey. Originally served with Lincolnshire Regiment (10th Foot), served in the Straits Settlement 11 May 1894 to 23 March 1895 and in South Africa. In the 1911 census he was aged 37, born New Romney, Kent, a Captain in H.M.'s Army, married to Ruby Lowell Stringer, resident 7, Church Circle, Farnborough, Hampshire. Cremated at GOLDERS GREEN CREMATORIUM, Middlesex.

Extract from the Charterhouse Register, Oration Quarter 1886:

Stringer, Frederick William. b. 7 May, 1873. (Verites); Left O.Q., 1891.-Joined Lincolnshire Regt., 1894; Adjutant, 1898-1901; served in S. African War as Special Service Officer, 1899, 1900; joined Army Service Corps, 1902; Capt., 1902.
Capt. F. W. Stringer, The Gables, New Romney.

Extract from England & Wales Government Probate Death Index 1916:

STRINGER Frederick William of 19 Reynolds-close Golders Green Middlesex died 30 June 1916 at the London Homeopathic Hospital Great Ormond-street Middlesex Administration (with Will limited) London 2 November to Mabel Emily Stringer spinster attorney of Henry Gray Stringer. Effects £249 13s. 3d.

Extract from South Eastern Gazette - Tuesday 11 July 1916, page 10:

DEATH OF
LIEUT.-COL F. W. STRINGER.

Lieut.-Colonel Frederick William Stringer, the Army Service Corps, who died at the Homeopathic Hospital, Great Ormond Street, on June 30th, was the second son of the late Mr. Henry Stringer, and was born at New Romney in May, 1873. He was educated at Charterhouse and Sandhurst, and in March. 1894, joined the Lincolnshire Regt., and which he was twice Adjutant. He served throughout the South African war as a Special Service Officer, and was awarded the Queen's medal with three clasps and the King's medal with two Clasps. On February 1st, 1892, he joined the Army Service Corps, was appointed Adjutant of the Training Establishment in October, 1909, Assistant Instructor in April, 1912, and Deputy Assistant Director of Transport at the War Office in February, 1914. He became Assistant Director of Transport at the War Office in March, 1915, and was promoted to the brevet rank of Lieut.-Colonel on the 29th November, 1915, for his services in connection with the war. He served in the Transport Directorate at the War Office with untiring energy and devotion to duty until within a few days of his death.

Extract from South Eastern Gazette - Tuesday 11 July 1916, page 10:

LIEUT.-COLONEL FREDERICK WILLIAM STRINGER, A.S.C., Assistant Director Transport, General Staff, War Office, died on June 30, from heart failure following an operation. Aged 43 years, he received his first appointment in the Lincolnshire Regiment March, 1894, and transferred to the Army Service Corps in 1902. served in the South African War, and was appointed Assistant Director of Transport March., 1915.

STRUDWICK

John Meredith Ker

Second Lieutenant, 2nd Battalion attached 6th Battalion, The Queen's (Royal West Surrey Regiment). Died of wounds 21 April 1918. Aged 19. Elder son of Ernest and Winifred Strudwick, of Stroud, Gloucestershire. Buried in ETAPLES MILITARY CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France. Plot XXVIII. Row J. Grave 4. Also commemorated on All Sainsts Church Tower Memorial, Uplands, Gloucestershire.

Extract from Gloucestershire Echo - Friday 5 September 1919, page 4, and Cheltenham Chronicle - Saturday 6 September 1919, page 2:

WHITESHILL.

To Mr. Ernest Willis Strudwick, of the Upper Grange, Stroud, to place a mural tablet in Whiteshill Church in memory of his elder son, Sec.-Lieut. John Meredith Ker Strudwick, of the Queen's Royal West Surrey Regt., who died of wounds in France on April 30th, 1918, and was laid to rest in the Militarymetery, Etaples, aged 19 years.

Extract from Gloucestershire Chronicle - Saturday 13 September 1919, page 7:

WAR MEMORIALS.
FACULTIES FOR GLOUCESTERSHIRE CHURCHES

The following faculties have been granted in the Gloucester Consistory Court:—

. . . . . . .

To Mr E. W. Strudwick. of the Upper Grange, Stroud, for the erection in Whiteshill Parish Church of a stone memorial tablet, bearing this inscription: “To the glory of God and in loving memory of John Meredith Ker Strudwick,2nd Lieut. the Queen's Royal West Surrey Regiment, Charterhouse School, and R.M.C., Sandhurst, elder son E. W. Strudwick, Esq., who died of wounds in France, April 20th, 1918, aged 19 years, and was laid to rest in the military cemetery at Etaples. 'I have fought good fight. I have finished my course, I have kept the faith.' This tablet is erected bv his parents.”

STUART

Robert Sheffield (Viscount - The Honourable)

Lieutenant the Hon. Robert Sheffield Stuart.  Captain, 1st Battalion, Royal Scots Fusiliers. Killed in action 2 November 1914. Aged 28. Born 1 May 1886. Son of 6th Earl of Castlestewart, of Stuart Hall, Stewartstown, Co. Tyrone; husband of the Hon. Mrs. Robert Stuart (now Mrs. Charles Elverson), of Julians Island, British Columbia. Educated at Charterhouse and Sandhurst. His brother Viscount Andrew John Stuart also fell. No known grave. Commemorated on LE TOURET MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France. Panel 12 and 13. Also commemorated on Donaghendry Parishioners Memorial, Stewartstown, Tyrone, Ireland.

Extract from the Charterhouse Register, Cricket Quarter 1900:

Stuart, Robert Sheffield. b. 1 May, 1886. (Pageites); Left L.Q., 1902.
R. S. Stuart, Esq., 117, Cheriton Road, Folkestone.

Extract from Kilmarnock Herald and North Ayrshire Gazette - Friday 20 November 1914, page 3:

Lieutenant the Hon. Robert Sheffield Stuart, Royal Scots Fusiliers (wounded), belongs to one of the collateral branches of the family of the Earl of Castle Stewart. He was born in 1886, and entered the Army in 1906. He was appointed lieutenant in 1911. Lieutenant Stuart was educated at Charterhouse and at the Royal Military College, Sandhurst.

Extract from Belfast Weekly News - Thursday 26 November 1914, page 7:

LORD CASTLE STUART’S SON MISSING.

Lieutenant the Honourable Robert Sheffield Stuart, who was wounded on the 2nd inst., is a son of the Earl of Castle Stewart, of Stuart Hall. Stewartstown, County Tyrone. Bom in 1886, he was educated at Charterhouse and at the Royal Military College, Sandhurst, obtaining his commission in the Royal Scots Fusiliers January, 1906. It is believed that Lieutenant Stuart‘was brought in by Indian troops, but no definite information has been received as to his whereabouts, and the Earl Castle Stewart is naturally very anxious for further news of his son.

Extract from Kilmarnock Herald and North Ayrshire Gazette - Friday 20 November 1914, page 3:

LIEUTENANT THE HONOURABLE R. S. STUART.

Lieutenant the Honourable Robert Sheffield Stuart, who was wounded on the 2nd inst., is a son of the Earl of Castle Stewart, of Stuart Hall. Stewartstown, County Tyrone. Bom in 1886, he was educated at Charterhouse and at the Royal Military College, Sandhurst, obtaining his commission in the Royal Scots Fusiliers January, 1906. It is believed that Lieutenant Stuart‘was brought in by Indian troops, but no definite information has been received as to his whereabouts, and the Earl Castle Stewart is naturally very anxious for further news of his son.

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